body~politic

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Fidel Castro's greatest atrocities and crimes - Part 1 | Babalú Blog

Fidel Castro's greatest atrocities and crimes - Part 1 | Babalú Blog

Translating Cuba on Twitter: "Police Confiscate Activist Henry Constantín’s Phone And Computer / 14ymedio https://t.co/JkrlwXWQcc https://t.co/kEu96UqqN0"

Translating Cuba on Twitter: "Police Confiscate Activist Henry Constantín’s Phone And Computer / 14ymedio https://t.co/JkrlwXWQcc https://t.co/kEu96UqqN0"

Cuba's Much Lauded Health Care System No Longer Has Even Aspirin to Give Us | The Huffington Post

Cuba's Much Lauded Health Care System No Longer Has Even Aspirin to Give Us | The Huffington Post





It’s been almost two years since I’ve been seen at a hospital. The last time was in that November of beatings and kidnapping when my lower back was in very bad shape. I learned a hard lesson on that occasion: given the choice between the Hippocratic oath and ideological fidelity, many physicians prefer to violate the privacy of their patients — often compared to the secrets of the confessional — rather than to oppose, with the truth, the State that employs them. The examples of this pouring forth on official television in recent months have strengthened my lack of confidence in the Cuban public health system. So I am healing myself with plants that grow on my balcony, I exercise every day to avoid getting sick, and I’ve even bought myself a Vademécum — a Physician’s Desk Reference — should I need to self-prescribe at some point. But despite my “medical revolt,” I haven’t failed to observe and investigate the growing deterioration of this sector.
Among the recent hospital cuts, the most notable have to do with resources for diagnostics. The doctors receive greatly reduced allocations for X-rays, ultrasounds and MRIs which they must distribute among their patients. Anecdotes about fractures that are set without first being X-rayed, or abdominal pains that become complicated because they can’t do a scan, are so common we’re no longer surprised. Such a situation is also vulnerable to patronage, where those who can offer a gift, or surreptitiously pay, obtain better medical care than do others. The cheese given to the nurse and the indispensable hand soap that many offer the dentist noticeably accelerate treatment and complement the undervalued salaries of those medical professionals.
A thermometer is an object long-missing from the shelves of pharmacies operating in local currency, while the hard currency stores have the most modern digital models. Getting a pair of glasses to alleviate near-sightedness can take months through subsidized State channels, or twenty-four hours at Miramar Optical where you pay in convertible pesos. Nor do the bodies who staff the hospitals escape these contrasts: we can consult the most competent neurosurgeon in the entire Caribbean region, but he doesn’t have even an aspirin to give us. These are the chiaroscuros that make us sick, and exhaust patients, their families, and the medical personnel themselves. And that leave us feeling defrauded by a conquest — long brandished before our faces — that has crumbled, and they won’t even let us complain about it.

The Cuban Mystique | The National Interest

The Cuban Mystique | The National Interest



Cuba has an allure for the farther reaches of the American left. Sicko, Michael Moore’s 2007 critique of the American healthcare system, suggested that Cuba’s hospitals were better than ours. New York City mayor Bill De Blasio honeymooned there in 1991 and worked with a Cuba-positive activist group around the same time. The far left is often full of praise for Cuba’s race relations, its economic system, and its foreign policy; securing the release from American prison of the “Cuban Five” spy network was a minor cause célèbre for years. (“Solidarity” events for the spies—whose leader was convicted in connection with the death of three Americans and a Cuban—were graciously hosted by the Service Employees International Union and the Venezuelan Embassy.) You can even take a trip to Cuba with lefty mag The Nation, an old hand in the world of totalitarian tourism. (The satirist P.J. O’Rourke took its 1982 “Peace Cruise” up the Volga River, describing his fellow travelers as “people who believed everything about the Soviet Union was perfect, but they were bringing their own toilet paper.”)
But the Cuban mystique extends into the mainstream. With its vintage cars and “crumbling beauty,” some see Havana as an escape from the modern world. With sanctions being softened, the American travel set is eagerly anticipating the chance to puff a Cohiba on the Plaza Vieja as rocket-finned cars roll by. But will a wave of American tourists—and American money—change the place? MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry worried that there may be “a downside” to deeper economic ties. CNN International was more blunt, tweeting, “See Cuba before American investors ruin it.” Both took fire for their soft line on the island autocracy. One of Harris-Perry’s own panelists said that “we have to stop fetishizing” the situation in Cuba, and that “Cubans are entitled to a good standard of living.” Libertarian intellectual Adam Gurri was sharper, charging that CNN might as well have bid travelers to “go exploit the people imprisoned in their horrible dictatorship before they taste terrible, terrible freedom...Go see Cuba before it's ruined by Cubans' freedom to worship [at] whatever church they want to, and patronize or open any business they want to.”
Gurri and others are quite right to mock those who overlook the high price Cubans pay to be “quaint.” Cuba is full of ruins and old cars because its dictatorial leaders have grossly mismanaged its economy, stifling innovation and creativity while failing to achieve the equality that the regime’s apologists claim in defense of its brutality. The Cuban people deserve a better government and a prosperous economy that gives them the ultimate freedom: the right to shape their own destinies through ingenuity and self-discipline.
The charms of Cuba, then, are in our own minds, not those of Cubans. Something must have been perverted in us to make us see beauty in Cuba’s wreckage. That maligned CNN article offers a hint at what that is: “Cuba is not like other places, or rather, not like anywhere that exists today. To some outsiders, it looks firmly stuck in the 1950s. Vintage cars roam the streets, the landscape is absent of strip malls and global chains, and the buildings—though crumbling—hark back to a grander time.” The article’s headline: “Why you should travel to Cuba before it looks like everywhere else.”
That’s what draws us to Cuba—a queasiness with our own style of development, a style of development that’s been followed in many places around the world. Local, independent businesses have been replaced by massive chains. Efficiency and economies of scale are devouring variety. You can get the same mediocre sandwich for the same price in the same atmosphere in a Subway anywhere in America. It’s convenient, and it’s nice to go into a shop in a new town and know exactly what you’re going to get, but it creates a sameness, a blandness. A franchise is an alien, inorganic injection into a community: it has no history, no roots, no tradition; it is only “present” in the most physical, atomistic interpretation of the word. You walk through the door and you are In Subway, no matter whether you’re in Peoria or Petersburg or Peking. The same place is now everywhere; the old debates about individuation that roiled the medievals and the early moderns come to mind, with a twist: if two identical places exist, why travel?
Cuba’s appeal, then, isn’t what its defenders would have us believe, that its model of development is better. Cuba simply did not develop—it’s been spared the creeping global sameness because it languishes in doldrums of Marxist tommyrot. That this mess of a country offers a pleasant contrast to our own is evidence of the hidden price we’ve paid for the cheap and the convenient. A better world may be possible—but Cuba isn’t it.
John Allen Gay is an assistant managing editor at The National Interest. He tweets at @JohnAllenGay.
Image: Flickr/Christopher Michel. CC BY 2.0.

The Cuban Mystique | The National Interest

The Cuban Mystique | The National InterestWe find the Communist state's poverty charming because of what we've gotten wrong, not because Havana's gotten anything right.


Stephen Miller on Twitter: ".@TwitterMoments Fixed it for you https://t.co/yhlRrqMeRI"

Stephen Miller on Twitter: ".@TwitterMoments Fixed it for you https://t.co/yhlRrqMeRI"

Saint Bibs on Twitter: "#CastroIsDeadParty https://t.co/58n8hOYGLg"

Saint Bibs on Twitter: "#CastroIsDeadParty https://t.co/58n8hOYGLg"

#CastroIsDeadParty

Jared Wyand ���� on Twitter: "The scene in Little Havana right now as they alternate chants between "Trump" and "Cuba Libre!" celebrating the death of Fidel Castro #Cuba https://t.co/y2Yqd43zWx"

Friday, November 25, 2016

Union Facts | Unfair Labor Practices

Union Facts | Unfair Labor Practices



When most people think of labor law violations, they probably think of “Big Business.” But employees, employers, and labor organizations file thousands of charges each year called Unfair Labor Practices against unions and union officials.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant, book of a lifetime: A rich panoply of materials | The Independent

Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant, book of a lifetime: A rich panoply of materials | The Independent



The essence of Kant's case is that the mind contributes substantially to the way the world appears to us in experience, imposing categories of interpretation that give the world its phenomenal character and structure. He (wrongly) suggests that the inner, or underlying, nature of what our cognitive capacities thus order is in principle inaccessible – science tells us otherwise – but (rightly) points out that the effort to apply the categories beyond their proper range of application gives rise to metaphysical excesses of speculative thought.

Thanksgiving: Hillary Fans Encourage Nasty, Vindictive Family Dinners


Ron Reagan, Jr., warned an MSNBC audience that liberals should avoid going to relatives’ homes if those relatives live in a state with concealed carry. Apparently Reagan assumes that Trump supporters will simply shoot liberal relatives who voted for Hillary.







Cartoon (TWD)

Parker Thomas on Twitter: "#rickandmorty https://t.co/Up4dJylir8 https://t.co/2AoXAdHgYn"

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Takes one to know one Chapter 1, a rick and morty fanfic | FanFiction

Takes one to know one Chapter 1, a rick and morty fanfic | FanFiction



Takes one to know one

By: TempestTemper 

"YOU MOTHERFUCKER, I am… I AM FROM A DIMENSION IN WHICH MY FUCKING BALLS DIDN'T SAY I AM GOING TO SIT IN-BETWEEN HIS LEGS!… FUCK YOU!" Rick F-786, actually known as Rikki was found by the Council of Ricks. No female version of Rick managed to create a portal gun... is she truly a Rick or just some bad idea of a clone? Some Ricks will try to find out... too bad she's just as Rick
Rated: Fiction T - English - Hurt/Comfort/Drama - Chapters: 5 




Folk-lore of Shakespeare: Chapter IV. Demonology and Devil Lore




"Zounds, sir, you're robb’d; for shame, put on your gown;


 Your heart is burst, you have lost half your soul;

 Even now, now, very now, an old black ram
 Is tupping your white ewe. Arise, arise;
 Awake the snorting citizens with the bell,
 Or else the devil will make a grandsire of you:
 Arise, I say."




Editorial: Donald Trump's America Has No Place For Metal | MetalSucks

Editorial: Donald Trump's America Has No Place For Metal | MetalSucks



But those who don’t know their history are doomed to get thoroughly fucked by it later, and this is a historic moment for metalheads. Metal has always stood outside of what is typical, obedient, and easily-swallowed, and those are three holy virtues of Donald Trump’s America. Don’t be fooled into thinking this will be a new era of incredible metal spurred on by someone fresh to hate. 



Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Obama IRS Official Admits Cincinnati Office Targeted Groups Based on ‘Guilt by Association’ - Breitbart

Obama IRS Official Admits Cincinnati Office Targeted Groups Based on ‘Guilt by Association’ - BreitbartTo be clear, the IRS was used by Obama and his allies to suppress his political opposition in a way that helped guarantee his reelection.  Recall this the next time you hear Obamadishonestly boast how his administration had no major scandals.

Monday, November 21, 2016

What does it mean if a book is 0th edition? : books

What does it mean if a book is 0th edition? : books



I'm was looking at some books on abesbooks and I found one that was 0th edition according to the description. Does anyone know what that means exactly?




Why A New Dune Movie Might Be On The Way - CINEMABLEND

Why A New Dune Movie Might Be On The Way - CINEMABLEND



Following the first story, Frank Herbert published five more Dune novels. After his death in 1986, Brian Herbert and author Kevin J. Anderson continued the series, starting with 1999's House Atreides, the first entry in the Prelude to Dune series. There's more than enough material for Legendary to create a Dune franchise both for movies and television, should the company go in that direction. Frank Herbert's main Dune books could comprise a movie series, while the prequel stories could be used for serialized television on a network like HBO or streaming service like Netflix. That's just one approach, but this mythology is definitely ripe for a new take outside of the printed page.




Johnson's Dictionary on Twitter

Johnson's Dictionary on Twitter: "Emoticonservative (n). Metacommunicative facial expression used by a posh English PM to make Scottish people think he is human. :-("

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Strauss–Howe generational theory - Wikipedia

Strauss–Howe generational theory - Wikipedia



The Strauss–Howe generational theory, created by authors William Strauss and Neil Howe, identifies a recurring generational cycle in American history. Strauss and Howe lay the groundwork for the theory in their 1991 book Generations, which retells the history of America as a series of generational biographies going back to 1584.[1] In their 1997 book The Fourth Turning, the authors expanded the theory to focus on a fourfold cycle of generational types and recurring mood eras in American history.








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