body~politic

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Trump: Obamacare key provisions to remain - BBC News

Trump: Obamacare key provisions to remain - BBC NewsMr Trump, who has pledged to repeal the 2010 law, said he will keep the ban on insurers denying coverage for pre-existing conditions.
He told the Wall Street Journal that he also favored allowing young adults to be insured on their parents' policies.

#SickBurn

Paige on Twitter: "Overheard - Girl: "this is about women's rights!" Boyfriend: "you should've voted for Hillary." Girl: "fuck Hillary!" https://t.co/MmoXvkJyCR"

#Statistics 12/NOV/16

Jay Minard on Twitter: "@DonCheadle @JeremyR86 This election was more about who DIDN'T vote than who did. https://t.co/YlftP2FYOT"

DOOMSDAY If Hillary Wins White House! | Globe Magazine

DOOMSDAY If Hillary Wins White House! | Globe MagazineBLUNDERING Hillary Clinton WILL trigger World War 3 if she wins the Oval Office! Now ONLY Donald Trump can stop the certain nuclear exchange between America and the Russians! That’s the blood-curdling conclusion of top intelligence analysts — and a ranking Pentagon admiral — who warns the Democrat’s high-handed ways will push Kremlin boss Vladimir Putin into a nightmare war that will kill millions! “Syria, the U.S., Iran and Russia make up the powder keg ready to explode into World War 3 — and President Hillary is the match that would set the conflagration off!” a former intelligence official tells GLOBE.

Man shot at Portland anti-Trump protest, the first shooting as rallies sweep nation | OregonLive.com





Transcending Obamacare and Achieving Market-Based Universal Coverage





Asa J ���� on Twitter: "Dear liberals, watch Chris Matthews embarrass Rachel Maddow and break down why Hillary lost. https://t.co/z7zLQXciKX"

Asa J ���� on Twitter: "Dear liberals, watch Chris Matthews embarrass Rachel Maddow and break down why Hillary lost. https://t.co/z7zLQXciKX"

Lana Del Rey Pays Tribute to Leonard Cohen | Pitchfork

Lana Del Rey Pays Tribute to Leonard Cohen | Pitchfork

Friday, November 11, 2016

Leah the Boss on Twitter: "The blue areas, and the high crime areas.....are also the areas rioting. Because Trump is...."hateful". #TrumpRiots https://t.co/SRzZAawvPS"

Leah the Boss on Twitter: "The blue areas, and the high crime areas.....are also the areas rioting. Because Trump is...."hateful". #TrumpRiots https://t.co/SRzZAawvPS"

US Scientists May Have Found a Way to Turn Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel | The Fiscal Times

US Scientists May Have Found a Way to Turn Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel | The Fiscal Times



It could not be more ironic: carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas responsible for climate change, may be able to help the renewables energy industry in the future. Scientists have discovered a way to turn carbon dioxide into ethanol with a single catalyst, totally by accident.
The accidental discovery, however, may have huge implications on balancing the power grid supplied by intermittent renewable sources, the scientists say, by creating a way to store excess electricity generated from wind and solar.
The carbon dioxide-to-ethanol reaction uses low-cost materials, and can be conducted at room temperature—and more importantly, the researchers believe it could be scaled up to industrial-level applications.
The ethanol obtained from carbon dioxide can be used in the ethanol fuel for cars. Meanwhile, capturing the carbon dioxide can also prevent at least a small portion of the greenhouse gas going to the atmosphere, the scientists say.
The world has now exceeded the 400 parts per million (ppm) threshold—for good—for carbon dioxide emissions. Last month, when carbon dioxide is typically at its minimum, the monthly value did not fall below 400 parts per million as is normally the case. As such, it will not drop below that mark any time soon—at least not in our lifetimes, scientists warn.
So, ironic or not, scientists finding ways to turn carbon dioxide into ethanol in a room-temperature, low-cost electrochemical reaction may come to the rescue of the earth’s climate, and possibly help the renewables industry store the electricity generated by variable sources such as solar and wind.
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the random discovery back in 2014, and published their study last month, after having tested the reaction multiple times at their lab.
The researchers used nano-technology, and found out that nano-spike catalysts convert carbon dioxide directly into ethanol.
“Ethanol was a surprise -- it’s extremely difficult to go straight from carbon dioxide to ethanol with a single catalyst,” lead scientist Adam Rondinone said in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s statement.
The nano-catalysts have a yield of around 63-65 percent, which means that you don’t waste much in the process, and the majority is actually converted into ethanol, Rondinone noted in a YouTube video.
In addition, the reaction needs only room temperature, so it can be turned on and off very easily, the scientist goes on explaining.
Regarding potential industrial-scale applications of this process, Rondinone said: “A process like this would allow you to consume extra electricity when it’s available to make and store as ethanol. This could help to balance a grid supplied by intermittent renewable sources.”
The scientist elaborated a bit more on the power grid and renewable industry implications in an interview with CBS News.
“Utilities are always attempting to balance generation versus load, producing versus using. We’re proposing this as an opportunity to balance on the load side. If there’s extra energy, it can be converted to ethanol and distributed and used with our current system.”
The carbon dioxide-to-ethanol direct conversion is a major scientific breakthrough. In theory, it would be a low-cost, easily controllable electrochemical reaction. The question is, can it really be scaled up to industrial level so as to become an efficient means of balancing the grid?
This article originally appeared on OilPrice.com. Read more from OilPrice.com:

The Truth About the Trump Protests

Conan On The 2016 Election Results - CONAN on TBS

KASSAM: Like Brexit's Cry Babies, Trump Protesters Will Disappear

KASSAM: Like Brexit's Cry Babies, Trump Protesters Will DisappearAnd just like the the protesters themselves: if the establishment has to tear down everything around it in order to re-establish its control, it will. President-elect Donald Trump will need to safeguard against this, and plans to combat such tactics must be devised right now.


Thursday, November 10, 2016

Gene Simmons talks Donald Trump, 2016 election

Novel nutritional treatment for manic and psychotic disorders: a review of tryptophan and tyrosine depletion studies and the potential of protein-b... - PubMed - NCBI

Novel nutritional treatment for manic and psychotic disorders: a review of tryptophan and tyrosine depletion studies and the potential of protein-b... - PubMed - NCBI



Novel nutritional treatment for manic and psychotic disorders: a review of tryptophan and tyrosine depletion studies and the potential of protein-based formulations using glycomacropeptide.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Current amino acid (AA) mixtures used in acute tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) plus phenylalanine (Phe) depletion and loading tests are unpalatable and lack specificity. Specificity is improved by reducing content of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and palatability to a certain extent by dose reduction.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aims to identify a palatable naturally occurring alternative(s) to amino acids with the desired BCAA content for use in the above tests.

METHODS:

A palatable alternative lacking in Trp, Tyr and Phe has been identified in the whey protein fraction caseino-glycomacropeptide (c-GMP). The absence of these three aromatic amino acids renders GMP suitable as a template for seven formulations for separate and combined depletion or loading and a placebo control. The absence of Phe and Tyr enables GMP to provide a unique nutritional therapy of manic and psychotic disorders by inhibition of cerebral dopamine synthesis and release and possibly also by enhancing glutamatergic function, in general, and in patients resistant to anti-psychotic medication, in particular.

RESULTS:

Seven GMP-based formulations for the above tests are proposed, two of which can be used in the above nutritional therapy and a third formulation as a placebo control in clinical trials.

CONCLUSIONS:

Development of these formulations should advance the above research and diagnostic tests, open new avenues for neuroscience research on monoamine function, and improve the therapy of bipolar and psychotic disorders and enhance the quality of life of sufferers.

PMID:
 
23828158
 
DOI:
 
10.1007/s00213-013-3191-9

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Joe: 2016 Election Results A 'Complete Earthquake' | Morning Joe | MSNBC

Stephen Miller on Twitter: "You know who voted for Trump? Rural voters with families to feed and jobs they can't quit to go protest things they don't like in NYC."

Stephen Miller on Twitter: "You know who voted for Trump? Rural voters with families to feed and jobs they can't quit to go protest things they don't like in NYC."

Dead Man Elected to Office in Oceanside | NBC 7 San Diego

Dead Man Elected to Office in Oceanside | NBC 7 San Diego




Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Many-worlds interpretation - Wikipedia

Many-worlds interpretation - Wikipedia



Many-worlds implies that all possible alternate histories and futures are real, each representing an actual "world" (or "universe"). In layman's terms, the hypothesis states there is a very large—perhaps infinite[2]—number of universes, and everything that could possibly have happened in our past, but did not, has occurred in the past of some other universe or universes. 






Ron Perlman Says He’s Running For President in 2020

Ron Perlman Says He’s Running For President in 2020



The election this week of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States throws open the possibility that the next generation of political leaders may draw upon the ranks of famous people who got their start in fields far away from politics. Kanye West, in fact, announced earlier this year that he aspires to run for president in 2020. And now, none other than Ron Perlman is throwing his hat in the ring.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA on Twitter: "HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA https://t.co/Pn6wRA2eUG"

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA on Twitter: "HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA https://t.co/Pn6wRA2eUG"

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Monday, November 7, 2016

SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO



SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO




7. IMPEDING AN INVESTIGATION (Judicial Watch vs. Commerce Dept. 1993-Present)
The Janet Reno led Justice Dept. has repeatedly attempted to stymie Judicial Watch in their freedom of information suit against the Commerce Dept., even though the Justice Dept. role is to make sure that the Commerce Dept. responds properly. The Judicial Watch suit was responsible for the John Huang deposition, which led to the exposure of millions of dollars in illegal contributions to the Democratic National Committee and Clinton campaigns. In February 1996, Judicial Watch also subpoenaed Ron Brown who was killed in the plane crash at Croatia during April 1996, while he was preparing for the deposition. An assistant U.S. attorney in the Justice Dept. filed numerous motions to delay the case, made repeated objections that were overruled during testimony and terminated a deposition against orders of the judge, who ruled that his conduct was "totally improper" and "totally scandalous." (JUDICIAL WATCH, AMERICAN SPECTATOR 10/97)

SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO



SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO




6. SUPPRESSION OF EVIDENCE (Tyson / Espy Investigation - 1994)
Janet Reno barred expansion of the probe into the affairs of Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy so that it would not include Don Tyson, the Clinton campaign contributor who was accused of bribing Espy. The investigation of Mike Espy, conducted by independent prosecutor Donald Smaltz, revealed evidence that Don Tyson was involved in drug abuse, drug distribution, money laundering and even murder for hire. Much of the evidence already existed in Arkansas State Police intelligence files. Tyson, owner of Tyson foods, had contributed over $600,000 to Bill Clinton campaigns. Tyson Foods counselor, James Blair, was the individual who turned a $1,000 cattle futures investment into $100,000 for Hillary Clinton. (CITIZENS FOR HONEST GOVERNMENT - CLINTON CHRONICLES)

SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO



SUMMARY OF IMPEACHABLE OFFENSE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST JANET RENO




4. WILLFUL NEGLIGENCE (Fiske Appointment - 1993)


Janet Reno appointed Robert Fiske as a special independent prosecutor to investigate the Clintons' Whitewater dealings even though Fiske was a lawyer for International Paper Inc., the company that had sold land to the Whitewater partnership of Clinton and McDougal. Fiske was also a lawyer for the Bank of Commerce and Credit, which received laundered drug money transfers from the Arkansas Development Finance Authority, (ADFA) as explained by ADFA marketing director Larry Nichols. Bank records show that the laundering abruptly ended when Barry Seal, who ran a Mena Arkansas drug trafficking ring was assassinated in 1986 just before he was to testify before a grand jury. ADFA was created by Bill Clinton, who was the only authorized payer. BCCI created one of the worst scandals in savings & loan history when it collapsed in 1985 and was shut down in July 1991. As president, Clinton dismissed charges against the head of BCCI, Clark Clifford, who was the former LBJ defense secretary. (CITIZENS FOR HONEST GOVERNMENT - CLINTON CHRONICLES)

Effects of a branched-chain amino acid drink in mania | The British Journal of Psychiatry

Effects of a branched-chain amino acid drink in mania | The British Journal of Psychiatry



Abstract

Background Administration of a complex tyrosine-free amino acid drink acutely decreases manic symptoms. Although a nutrient-based approach to illness management is attractive, complex amino acid drinks are too unpalatable for repeated administration.
Aims To assess whether a simple, branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) drink diminishes manic symptoms acutely and following repeated administration.
Method Twenty-five patients with mania were randomly and blindly allocated to treatment with BCAA (60 g) or placebo daily for 7 days.
Results Relative to placebo, the BCAA drink lowered mania ratings acutely over the first 6 h of treatment. In protocol completers there was a persistent advantage to the BCAA group 1 week after the end of treatment.
Conclusions A nutritional intervention that decreases tyrosine availability to the brain acutely ameliorates manic symptoms. Further studies are required to assess whether this approach has longer-term efficacy.


Sunday, November 6, 2016

Linda Suhler, Ph.D. on Twitter: "The av family has <$1,000 in savings. The av Obamacare deductible is >$12,000. If you get sick you'll be bankrupted--do the math. #VoteTrump"

Linda Suhler, Ph.D. on Twitter: "The av family has <$1,000 in savings. The av Obamacare deductible is >$12,000. If you get sick you'll be bankrupted--do the math. #VoteTrump"

Joe Biden Is A Pedophile, Caught On A Hot Mic

Living with PTSD: How one of Canada’s first troops in Afghanistan learned to take control - The Globe and Mail




EDMONTON The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Nov. 03, 2016 11:26PM EDT



This article is part of The Unremembered, a Globe and Mail investigation into soldiers and veterans who died by suicide after deployment during the Afghanistan mission.

On Remembrance Day last year, before more than 1,000 people at the Royal Canadian Legion in Wetaskiwin, Alta., a nervous Russ Lee walked toward the microphone. A provincial sheriff in the small Alberta community and a former soldier, he had never before talked publicly about his time in Afghanistan or his struggles since. But the mounting suicides of Afghanistan war veterans had spurred him to open up.

“Today, I want to speak to you about war, but not the type of war you may be thinking of,” the retired corporal told the crowd of residents and uniformed men and women. “Today, I want to speak to you of the war that our members of the Canadian Forces fight when the combat mission is over, the war that is fought inside of us.”

Mr. Lee, 40, is still fighting that war, 14 years after returning from the front lines. But it is a war that he is in control of now: His nightmares no longer keep him from sleeping, and unexpected triggers, such as the smell of diesel fuel, don’t paralyze him like they used to or send him into a fury. Through therapy and church, long motorcycle rides and perseverance, he has learned to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and step away from suicide’s edge. Healing is possible, he said. PTSD is not a death sentence.

“It’s not easy. And the road map for every person is going to be different. But it’s important to realize that you’re the master,” he said over dinner at a busy south Edmonton restaurant in May. “You can decide to let the disorder kill you and hold you down … or you can choose to be the person who learns from the disorder, learns how to control it, and gets stronger from it.”

The son of English immigrants, Mr. Lee was among the first Canadian troops sent to Afghanistan. Based at CFB Edmonton, he was a supply technician who specialized in biological and nuclear decontamination. He joined the army when he was 23 after spending his youth in the cadet program. He was looking for a decent-paying career that didn’t require heading to postsecondary school.

He had been told it would be a few years before he got the chance to deploy overseas. But then the Sept. 11 attacks happened and the Canadian military began preparing for war. Mr. Lee arrived in Afghanistan in February, 2002, attached to the 3rd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry. He was excited to be there.

But as the months and bloodshed wore on, the brutality of war set in and left deep scars. There were kids with missing legs using AK-47 assault rifles as a crutches. Grave sites were everywhere. Mr. Lee recalls watching dogs pick away at one stone-covered grave and pulling out an arm.

Mr. Lee deployed to Afghanistan in February, 2002. He worked as a supply technician.

PHOTO COURTESY RUSS LEE

Canada’s first Afghanistan war casualties occurred during the tour. Four soldiers were killed and eight were wounded when an American fighter pilot mistakenly released a laser-guided bomb while the Canadians performed a nighttime firing exercise at the old al-Qaeda base of Tarnak Farm. The tragedy devastated the Canadians. Mr. Lee became depressed and angry and struggled to sleep. All he could think about was going home.

When home finally came in August, 2002, it didn’t offer the relief he expected. His short temper got shorter, he could barely sleep, and loud noises terrified him. While at the Edmonton Valley Zoo one day with his fiancée, he suddenly froze, the colour drained from his face, and he started sweating. Lucy, the elephant, had kicked hard at her door. To him, it sounded like incoming artillery.

Driving on Edmonton roads was also difficult. There were times he felt as if he was back in Afghanistan. He recalls angrily jumping out of his car at a red light to confront the driver behind him, because he thought he was being followed. “I was wound so tight,” Mr. Lee said. “I was ready to pull this guy through the driver-side window of his car. I had lost my mind.”

A child was in the back seat. The shocked look on the child’s sweet face snapped Mr. Lee out of his rage.

Military doctors at the Edmonton base diagnosed Mr. Lee with depression a few months after his return and told him they suspected he had PTSD. He brushed off the suggestion: PTSD wasn’t a diagnosis he was ready to hear. The young soldier had an image of what PTSD looked like: A 40-year-old unemployed alcoholic, sitting alone in his house, surrounded by empty beer cans and bottles, “just existing, until he didn’t exist any more.”

Mr. Lee was given antidepressants and medication to help him sleep, but the pills made him feel like a zombie. His relationship disintegrated and he stopped communicating with his family. He was in a haze, and losing touch with reality.

Mr. Lee’s jacket says “Warning: This vet is medicated for your protection. P.T.S.D.: Unless you have seen what I have seen then you don’t know.” 


AMBER BRACKEN FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL

One day in 2003, he’s not sure when, city and military police knocked on his apartment door. He hadn’t showered for four to five days and his apartment was littered. He was supposed to be at work, but hadn’t been there for a week. The police took him to the base, where he was ordered to see the doctor.

Inside the medical office, Mr. Lee recalls that an imaginary pill was placed in front of him. “Russ,” the doctor said, “if you took this pill, you’d die right now. What would you do?” The broken-down soldier didn’t hesitate: “I’d kill you for that pill.”

The doctor adjusted his medication, but Mr. Lee’s suicidal thoughts re-emerged after a few months. Desperate for help, he asked to be checked into a hospital.

The first hospital left him alone for two days; a frustrated Mr. Lee checked himself out. At the second hospital, he met a mental-health doctor who listened. The specialist spent several hours a day with Mr. Lee during his two-week stay and introduced him to PTSD coping techniques. He was finally ready to accept that he had the trauma disorder.

Mr. Lee is thankful he never turned to alcohol or drugs to numb his pain, because grappling with an addiction would have made recovery tougher. He found his way back through therapy, not pills. He believes the Canadian Forces is overly reliant on medication to treat PTSD.

Medically released from the army in October, 2004, Mr. Lee continued with therapy and found work, first with his ex-fiancée’s father and then with the Commissionaires, a security company that has made hiring veterans a priority. In 2008, he became a provincial sheriff, which is a sworn peace officer in Alberta. Mr. Lee’s duties include monitoring highways for speeders and dangerous drivers and responding to traffic accidents.

He has setbacks, such as when he attended a horrific fatal crash in 2010 and when he recently lost a military friend to suicide, but he has stayed on the long road to healing

On last Remembrance Day, Mr. Lee received a standing ovation after he spoke, but he was too nervous to notice. Dressed in a blue suit with a red poppy on his lapel, the slender, tattooed sheriff ended his speech with this plea: “Today remember the fallen, but also remember the ones that are still here. They may still be at war.”

Yes, The Clintons Are Uniquely Corrupt: A Grand Finale Essay – Medium

Yes, The Clintons Are Uniquely Corrupt: A Grand Finale Essay – Medium

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