body~politic

~~~~~~~~~> Does DEBT  become SERFDOM ?

Tweet me @ColonialSerf, and let me know, and I'll share the answers HERE!!!

Saturday, April 11, 2015

BBC Breaking News on Twitter: "Kenya identifies 1 of 4 al-Shabab #GarissaAttack gunmen as son of government official - interior ministry http://t.co/KoJu5O0E20"

BBC Breaking News on Twitter: "Kenya identifies 1 of 4 al-Shabab #GarissaAttack gunmen as son of government official - interior ministry http://t.co/KoJu5O0E20"

‘Enormous progress’: Jonah Goldberg updates the status of Hillary’s campaign headquarters | Twitchy

‘Enormous progress’: Jonah Goldberg updates the status of Hillary’s campaign headquarters | Twitchy

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Democrats: Political Party or UFO Cult.

CounterMoonbat on Twitter: "@LilMissRightie I can't tell if the Democrats are a political party or a UFO cult: http://t.co/XtNObIzMuz"

Filipino maid 'beaten and raped' is rescued from Bahrain employer after Facebook appeal goes viral | South China Morning Post

Filipino maid 'beaten and raped' is rescued from Bahrain employer after Facebook appeal goes viral | South China Morning Post

Friday, April 10, 2015

Speaker at NRA Convention Actually Gives Speech about Firearms Law

Speaker at NRA Convention Actually Gives Speech about Firearms Law





Rubio started out by setting the right of the people to keep and bear arms in its necessary practical and philosophical context, and then by noting that to suggest that it doesn’t apply anymore is as absurd is to suggest that the First Amendment doesn’t apply to the digital world. Hitting a likely theme of his campaign, Rubio took on executive overreach, establishing that the president has absolutely no power to “tell a young woman that she is better off without the protection of a firearm,” or to “tell a father that he cannot own a gun to defend his family or his property.” President Obama, Rubio lamented, has “wielded human tragedy in an attempt to subvert our rights.” But “the sins of the evil do not justify restricting the rights of the good,” he added.

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/416793/speaker-nra-convention-actually-gives-speech-about-firearms-law-charles-c-w-cooke

Abby Martin on Twitter: "War, Inc. Obama's foreign weapons deals in his first 5 yrs exceeds Bush's full 8 yrs in office by nearly $30 billion: http://t.co/PuXqjoxtMS"

Abby Martin on Twitter: "War, Inc. Obama's foreign weapons deals in his first 5 yrs exceeds Bush's full 8 yrs in office by nearly $30 billion: http://t.co/PuXqjoxtMS"

PanAm Post on Twitter: "25 Hispanic Presidents Join Clarion Call for New #Venezuela http://t.co/vwDs9eu45o @elisavasquez88 #PanamaSummit #HumanRights"

PanAm Post on Twitter: "25 Hispanic Presidents Join Clarion Call for New #Venezuela http://t.co/vwDs9eu45o @elisavasquez88 #PanamaSummit #HumanRights"

Cubannator (USMCVet) on Twitter: "There he is, #Cuba's brutal dictator who has murdered 1000s of Cubans first hand standing next to your President. http://t.co/80VQDTpu0W"

Cubannator (USMCVet) on Twitter: "There he is, #Cuba's brutal dictator who has murdered 1000s of Cubans first hand standing next to your President. http://t.co/80VQDTpu0W"

Bluebird of happiness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bluebird of happiness - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The genuine bluebirds (Sialia) are found only in North America.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Will 2016 really be a foreign policy election? | WashingtonExaminer.com

Will 2016 really be a foreign policy election? | WashingtonExaminer.com



The Labor Department divided earners into five levels, and income went down for four of the five.




Tamara on Twitter: ""In Cuban farms, the production (in extremely fertile soil) is almost nonexistent. Product of collective farms." @mungowitz"

Tamara on Twitter: ""In Cuban farms, the production (in extremely fertile soil) is almost nonexistent. Product of collective farms." @mungowitz"

Cronyism hard to defeat but controllable - Editorial - JamaicaObserver.com

Cronyism hard to defeat but controllable - Editorial - JamaicaObserver.com



Cronyism hard to defeat but controllable
We return today to an issue we started on Sunday, the busines of cronyism, which is a debilitating problem in the Caribbean region, including Jamaica.
Cronies are special people who have made their careers by carefully planned and cultivated relationships with people in positions to help them. They provide their sponsors with unquestioning loyalty and reliable availability. In some cases, they do have some skills and so will not embarrass their mentor.
Cronyism is pandemic in the public sector but is much less so in the private sector. However, private sector cronyism exists and is crucial to businesses in economic difficulty. While the leaders of big business do not allow cronies to attach themselves to their companies, they buy protection, consideration and access by contributing money to the two political parties. They assiduously cultivate politicians with favours, none of which could be classified as a bribe.
There are a group of professional cronies who oscillate between feeding off the state when their political party is in power and in turn helping to maintain the sponsor when their political party is in opposition. When the party is in power, the sponsor allows the "income-generating crony" to maximise economic gain and the "wealth-generating crony" to optimise contracts.
When in opposition, income-seeking cronies assist their sponsors by running errands, purveying information and discreetly carrying out political tasks. While the sponsor is out of political office, wealth-generating cronies have to provide financial support and material support, such as the use of motor vehicles, office space and the like.
This game of political cronyism operates all over the world. In Jamaica it is no better or worse than anywhere else. The question is, what can be done about it?
One important step is to establish rigorous transparency in the selection of persons to be appointed by politicians by first, creating job descriptions for every post; second, setting up transparent application and selection processes for all posts; and third, establishing some institutional oversight mechanism along the lines of the Public Service Commission.
For example, we were pleased in 2008 when the decision was taken to select the current director of public prosecutions, Ms Paula Llewellyn, through this process, instead of the traditional practice of the prime minister recommending an individual.
Cronies who cannot be full-time and who get the minor reward of being put on boards of directors should be subject to screening to ensure they have some knowledge of the subject area of the organisation and they should be given a course on what are the duties of a board director.
The steps we have recommended could immeasurably improve the performance of the public sector and send a signal that selection for jobs in the sector is based on merit.
Of course, these measures, will not relieve the country of the hardcore serial cronies who make a life-long practice of feeding off the State. Indeed, old cronies never retire, they just get recycled because they either need the money or they love their proximity to power.

Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Acan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Acan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Acan is the Mayan god of wine. His name means 'belch'. He is identified with the local brew, balche, made from fermented honey to which the bark of the balche tree has been added.[1]




Colin Post on Twitter: "Venezuela Reaches the Final Stage of Socialism: No Toilet Paper http://t.co/e0hyGVkCSj via @CatoInstitute"

Colin Post on Twitter: "Venezuela Reaches the Final Stage of Socialism: No Toilet Paper http://t.co/e0hyGVkCSj via @CatoInstitute"

Venezuelan Indian: Canaima: Pemon Spirit of Death

Venezuelan Indian: Canaima: Pemon Spirit of Death



For most people who visit Venezuela, the name Canaima conjures up images of jungle tours, boat trips in dugout canoes up the Rio Carrao and visits to the base camp below Angel Falls, the highest waterfall in the world.

But for the Pemon Indians of the Gran Sabana, Canaima is nothing less than the evil spirit which lurks in wait for them in the dense forest, the poisonous snake in the underbrush, the sharp branch that catches them in the eye.

According to Venezuelan writer Jose Berti, the Pemon, "like most pre-Colombian tribes don't believe in a natural death; and in order to explain their eternal disappearance from this world, they have created a symbolic character, Canaima, who pursues them without rest and who in the end defeats and kills them."

Canaima, the Indians say, can take the form of a jaguar in the forest, or a spirit who passes through their huts at night. Every mishap that ends in cuts and bruises is laid at his door.

"If an Indian suffers from pneumonia, they say that Canaima has blown on his chest, if he has a stomach ache, it is put down to the evil work of Canaima, so that Canaima, or Death, is his implacable and eternal enemy," he adds.

I experienced the Pemon fear of Canaima first hand a number of years ago when I was working in Canaima camp as a tour guide. I had started working there with the idea that I would spend all my time leading tour groups to Angel Falls and the tepuis but my first weeks were spent at the small airstrip fighting the other guides for the few tourists who arrived in air taxis from Ciudad Bolivar.

One morning, the drowsy stupor of the airstrip was broken by shouts that something was happening down at the lagoon.

It seems that an American tourist had gone for a swim in the cold, tea-red waters of the lagoon and had never come back. He was with a young Venezuelan woman and her child and when they lost sight of him they had called the National Guard and the staff at the beach bar to help them look, but nobody could find any trace of him.

She said he was a strong swimmer and had insisted on swimming beyond the area marked out near the beach with small bouys and out towards the Hacha Falls.

Later, somebody said a reward had been offered for anybody who found him. It was feared he had drowned but the National Guard needed proof.

Next day, the rumours of a reward had spread all over the camp. People came down from the base camps to help in the search. As the day wore on it seemed the reward changed with whoever you asked until it reached several thousand dollars, a small fortune for most people marooned out here in the middle of the jungle.

Soon, nearly all the Indians had launched their wooden curiaras (canoes) and fashioned long branches and poles so they could probe the bottom of the lagoon and find the unfortunate US tourist. Some even brought out old diving masks, useless in the dark waters, and dived in again and again to feel with their hands along the deep, murky bottom.

It seemed like everybody had come out to try their luck that day and the day after.

But it was only after they'd all given up, on the third day, that the body was found- just floating on the surface. Again I was at the small airstrip when the word came and we all rushed down to the small church in the camp to see what they'd found.

The Pemon Indians from the village next door had already arrived and were holding cloths or their T-shirts over their mouths and noses so as not to be infected by any vapours from the corpse.

The body had set rigid and the man, who was at least six foot, looked like a large action figure, his legs caught in the action of kicking out against the eddies and swirling currents that had dragged him down. He must have been head first down in the water because his shoulders were enormous and pink, puffed up like a superhero. His face was contorted with the effort of saving his skin. The fish had nibbled away at his ears.

But the strangest thing was his ankle. The Indians were all pointing to some marks on his ankle, like the puncture marks a snake might make, only it would have to be a mighty large snake to make those kind of marks.

"Anaconda bite", one young Indian said. I'd seen small anacondas in the lagoon and on the beach but never anything that could hold a grown man under the water like that.

Like, where's Jennifer Lopez when you need her?

But the older Pemon were shaking their heads: "Canaima", an old man said in a sort of whisper, as if it was a word you shouldn't say out loud. "It was the Canaima who took him down to its lair in the calm waters behind the falls."

And that was it. Case closed. All anybody could talk about was the Canaima. And nobody went swimming, at least for a week, until the tourists started to arrive en masse and we were all too busy to think about the strange case of the big, scary snake in the lagoon.

I guess I'll never know what caused those marks on the dead man's ankles, but for a moment, standing in that church with most of the Pemon village crowded in around me, the idea that he had been drowned by a malignant spirit taking the form of a giant anaconda seemed to make perfect sense.

Russell Maddicks




Pemon Myth 1: The Legend of Makunaima
Pemon Myth 2: The Tree of Life
Pemon Myth 3: The Great Flood and the Creation of Roraima
Auyan-tepui, Angel Falls and Pemon myths

Stanford Scientists Demo Promising Aluminum-Ion Battery | TechCrunch

Stanford Scientists Demo Promising Aluminum-Ion Battery | TechCrunch



Scientists at Stanford University have developed a prototype bendable battery made from aluminum that charges very quickly, is long lasting and offers safety advantages over lithium cells given the materials used are less volatile and do not catch fire if perforated. So, bottom line, aluminum-ion batteries could result in safer consumer electronics in future that also charge faster and can have thinner or even flexible form factors — all of which sounds pretty handy for future generations of wearables.

We’ve seen thin and bendy lithium-ion batteries in research labs before, but aluminum offers cost and safety advantages over lithium — hence researchers’ ongoing interest in the material. And while developing a high performance, commercially viable aluminum-ion battery has proved elusive thus far, the Stanford researchers stumbled on using graphite (a type of carbon) for the cell’s cathode — which they say yields good performance.
Their battery has been able to withstand more than 7,500 charging cycles without any loss of capacity, vs other lab developed aluminum batteries typically lasting around 100 cycles before expiring. “This was the first time an ultra-fast aluminum-ion battery was constructed with stability over thousands of cycles,” the authors write in the journal Nature, where their research has been published.
The ionic liquid electrolyte they’re using for the battery is a salt that’s liquid at room temperature — another safety and environmental advantage for their proto cell — held inside a flexible polymer-coated pouch. Their battery can generate around 2 volts of electricity, which they say is also higher than other researchers have achieved with aluminum. In the video they demo a couple of their prototype batteries being used to charge a smartphone “within a minute”.
Of course it’s early days for the research, with improvements to voltage and energy density required if the tech is to be commercialized. But the researchers seem positive their aluminum-ion battery tech has promise.
“Our battery produces about half the voltage of a typical lithium battery. But improving the cathode material could eventually increase the voltage and energy density. Otherwise, our battery has everything else you’d dream that a battery should have: inexpensive electrodes, good safety, high-speed charging, flexibility and long cycle life. I see this as a new battery in its early days. It’s quite exciting,” Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford and one of the researchers, told the Stanford Report.
Beyond small electronics devices, one interesting potential use-case mentioned by Dai is for storing renewable energy on the electrical grid. Lithium cells’ durability means they aren’t ideally suited for this application. But aluminum cell’s ability to last for tens of thousands of charges, and their rapid charge and discharge, offers a possible future alternative.

Mudejar architecture in Aragon in , Spain: Monuments in | Spain.info in english

Mudejar architecture in Aragon in , Spain: Monuments in | Spain.info in english



The symbiosis of techniques and ways of understanding architecture resulting from Jewish, Muslim and Christian cultures living side by side gave rise to a new style called Mudejar, which reached its peak in the city of Teruel.




tlhIngan-Hol Archive: Mon Nov 30 13:30:59 2009

It's easy enough to have two negatives in a Klingon sentence:
{matambe'qangbe'} "We are unwilling to not be silent", for example.
However, you won't get two negatives both meaning the same thing.

Monday, April 6, 2015

Obama Proves: Iran Deal Is Munich II - Breitbart

Obama Proves: Iran Deal Is Munich II - Breitbart



For days, lefties like Chris Matthews of MSNBC and Jonathan Chait of the New Republic have been fuming that conservative critics of the Iran “framework” have referred to it as the sequel to the Munich agreement of 1938—the deal that defined “appeasement.” Yet President Barack Obama proved his critics correct on Monday when he rejected Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s suggestion that Iran be required to accept Israel’s right to exist as a condition of a final deal.

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