body~politic

~~~~~~~~~> Does DEBT  become SERFDOM ?

Tweet me @ColonialSerf, and let me know, and I'll share the answers HERE!!!

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Now that Humans Are Living Longer, College Should be Mandatory | Motherboard

Now that Humans Are Living Longer, College Should be Mandatory | Motherboard



Zoltan Istvan is a futurist, author of the book The Transhuma​nist Wager, and founder of the Transhumanist Party. He writes an occasional column for Motherboard in which he ruminates on the future beyond natural human ability.
Regardless what state you live in, at least some high school education or its equivalent is required by law in America. These mandates ensure most every kid enters adulthood with the skills to read, write, perform mathematics, and be moderately civilized. 
But in an era where scientists believe people born today may live to ​150 years of age, are we shortchanging ourselves by not requiring a longer, more rigorous period of education for our youth? Is kindergarten to high school really sufficient for centenarians, or is it time to require all American kids start attending college too?
The history of compulsory education in America goes back almost a century. By 1918, every state required kids to attend at least elementary school. Over the following nine decades, states increased their educational requirements, ensuring youth continue their schooling until at least until 15 years of age, but often until 17 or 18. Whether by traditional high school, charter school, or home schooling, in the 21st century the majority of American youth—​almost 80 percent—graduate with a high school-level education.
Most of us take this all for granted because education is so enshrined in American culture and social life. Receiving some form of schooling seems to be the one major topic that citizens—regardless of politics, race, ethnicity, religion, and wealth—agree is positive. A lot of this is due to the fact that education improves one's odds of succeeding in the job market. However, that job market is changing quickly. Last decade, the big news was jobs moving overseas to China. Now it's machines taking many of the jobs in America that are left. Experts predict that by 2025 ​a third of all jobs will be lost to robots and software.
Politicians are fumbling over themselves trying to find a way to stop this job-loss carnage, one that is a real threat to many US citizens. There's no easy answer to the problem, but one thing is for sure, getting everyone to attend college probably can't hurt. It's a well-known fact that higher education ​generally makes one far more likely to be employed, get better wages, and land the job and career they want. Studies have ​shown college grads are happier, healthier, remain married longer, and end up considerably wealthier later in life than those who stopped their educations directly after high school.
In fact, if you look closely, it's hard to find any downsides of receiving a higher education at all. Most people are genuinely in favor of the idea of our country spilling over with spunky, self-confident college grads looking to change the world. The promise of discussing Noam Chomsky, String Theory, and Moore's Law with any twenty-something-year-old you meet on the street seems refreshing.
Of course, college is about much more than just scholastic education. It's also about interacting with professors, debating peers over controversial books, and choosing a worthy major. For many, college also goes hand in hand with wild parties, foreign travel, drugs, new philosophies, and sexual exploration. It's no wonder many people call college the best years of their lives.
So why doesn't society legally mandate such a universally positive experience? Why do we stop at high school and leave the main course of educational development on the table, untouched? 
Part of the problem has to do with lifespans. Between the 1920s and 1960s when many states passed the bulk of their compulsory high school education laws, lifespans averaged about ​63 years of age. That left an 18-year-old high school grad with paltry 35 years to find a spouse, have babies, make a career, and get prepared for a decade long retirement before dying.
What a difference a few generations make. Most youth today expect to live to at least 100. Marriage is in ​slow decline. Retirement seems boring. And increasingly men and women are seeing IVF culture as a safeguard to push back having children until their late 30s. All this leaves much more time for pursuits like travel, professional ambitions, education, and even just simple loafing. Extended longevity and advancing reproductive science are wonderful things, but they're really just the tip of the iceberg. In the future, expect these trends to sharply accelerate, giving both women and men much more time in their 20s and 30s to figure out what they want to do in life.

WITH ALL THIS EXTRA FREE TIME, DOESN'T IT MAKE SENSE TO REQUIRE OUR YOUTH TO EDUCATE THEMSELVES MORE?

Here lies the real conundrum with upcoming generations. With all this extra free time, doesn't it make sense to require our youth to educate themselves more? It will only help them figure themselves out more and give them the skills to reach whatever dreams they want. Unfortunately, the problems with such a proposal are deep and multifaceted. For starters, such a proposal reeks of authoritarianism. It's understandable to demand 17-year-old go to school. But a 21-year old who is already a bonifide tax paying adult? Compliance with such a law might be impossible. College dropout rates could soar. Our culture has long established that once a kid hits 18 and is out of high school, they are a free agent—a master of the universe.
Another issue critics will have is the complaint that mandating higher education will mean the Mark Zuckerbergs and Tiger Woods of the world won't be able to start their companies or turn pro in their sports, since they'll be forced to go to school. An easy way around that dilemma is to create a college equivalent test, similar to the high school ​GED. Kids that are smart enough to pass can skip out on school if they don't want to go. They'll miss out on the fun, but at least society will know they've got the smarts to succeed.
The biggest issue about compulsory higher education, though, is affordability: Who is going to pay for almost 20 million American youth to go to college? You won't convince an entire generation of students to take out loans. America is already facing a serious school ​loan crisis. Maybe, society could incentivize attending college. Might we pay students to get an upper education, like some places in Europe? Or what about offering significant tax benefits, or even creating a monster sister-bill to the existing ​GI Bill?
Another idea could involve lessening prison operation costs across America. According to a recent ​report, we spend four times the amount on the American prison system than on education. Many convicts are between 18-22 years of age. Perhaps college would keep them out of prison and significantly drop incarceration and judicial costs. It might be enough to help foot a compulsory college education bill while also improving crime rates around the country.
As challenging as financial considerations for all this might be, the flipside of the coin and its liabilities might be more daunting. In an age where jobs are being lost to machines and China may already be academically our superior, perhaps America needs to dig deeper into its pockets to make its kids smarter. Perhaps the more important question is: In order to protect our future and our nation, can we afford not to have all our youth receive some higher education?
Its worth mentioned too that getting a college education is no longer exclusively living in dorms and learning in brick and mortar classrooms, many of which are halfway across the country. Education is moving online in a big way; virtual classrooms are popping up everywhere. Already, almost all higher education institutions, from small liberal arts colleges to the Ivy League, now offer online classes. Many future students might not even need to leave their homes to get a bachelor's degree. Online education is generally far ​cheaper than attending a traditional college, and this could significantly help with compulsory upper education costs.
America is entering one of the most challenging times it's ever faced. We are up against increasing wealth inequality, frightening climate issues, and growing technological dominance over nearly every aspect of our lives. Are we going to shortchange our youth because we can't afford it? Or because it's too bossy of us? Or because it requires going against decades of institutionalized culture. Perhaps it's time to ante up: Build new colleges. Hire new teachers. Forge new curriculums. And create a country full of the smartest, brightest, most inquisitive minds on the planet. The brains you insist on our youth having now will carry us all later, no matter how terrifying or beautiful the future becomes. For almost a century America has held that education is a necessity, but we should be cognizant of increasing the length of that education as our citizen's lifespans increase.  

BBC – The Genius of Photography

BBC – The Genius of Photography



Ep 1 – Fixing the Shadows

Fixing the Shadows tells the story of the birth of photography itself and the profound question that it raised, and which has never been satisfactorily answered: what is photography for? Detailing the rival methods of the pioneers Henry Fox Talbot and Louis Daguerre for вЂ˜fixing the shadows’, the programme examines how photography took its place alongside other new technologies like the railway and telegraph to transform our understanding of the modern world. It describes how pioneer photographers like the portraitist Nadar asserted the status of photography as an art only for this status to be transformed by the Kodak revolution, which put the camera into the hands of the masses who unlocked its potential for surreality, randomness and surprise. Finally it examines the case of Jacques-Henri Lartigue, the schoolboy photographer who demonstrated the true genius of photography in the hands of the amateur. Includes interviews with Chuck Close and David Byrne




Amorphous ice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Amorphous ice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Amorphous ice is an amorphous solid form of water, meaning it consists of water molecules that are randomly arranged like the molecules of common glass.[citation needed] Everyday ice is a crystalline material where the molecules are regularly arranged in a hexagonal lattice whereas amorphous ice is distinguished by a lack of long-range order in its molecular arrangement. Amorphous ice is produced either by rapid cooling of liquid water (so the molecules do not have enough time to form a crystal lattice) or by compressing ordinary ice at low temperatures.
Although almost all water ice on Earth is the familiar crystalline Ice Ih, amorphous ice dominates in the depths of interstellar medium, making this likely the most common structure for H2O in the universe at large.[1]
Just as there are many different crystalline forms of ice (currently fifteen known), there are also different forms of amorphous ice, distinguished principally by their densities.




Enchanted Arms - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Enchanted Arms - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The story of Enchanted Arms begins as Atsuma studies to become an Enchanter along with his friends Makoto and Toya at Enchanter's University in Yokohama City. When the three skip class to attend a local festival, an earthquake occurs and the man-made golems in the area become berserk and are now attacking people. Rushing back to the university, the three find that things are in chaos, and that the mysterious "sealed ward" had been opened. While seeking to discover what has happened, the group meet up with the Queen of Ice, a Devil Golem sealed long ago. With her immense Ether capability and regeneration power, she overpowers the three. She takes Toya as ice falls on Makoto; as a result, Atsuma fights her by using his right arm that turns into something out of the ordinary that could harm a Devil Golem.
Detained in London City, Atsuma learns that the Queen of Ice had destroyed Yokohama. Escaping with local resident Karin and her bodyguard Raigar, Atsuma discovers that reveal that the two are part of a resistance movement that opposes King Caliban's plans to revive the Emperor of Fire, another Devil Golem hidden right under the city. They find that Yokohama is now an icy wasteland. Venturing further in and returning to the university, they encounter Professor Kou, a teacher at the university. He reveals that he was very interested in Atsuma's right arm and started the golem riot to awaken its power, all for the Queen's revival and the restoration of Magic, the greatest technology in existence. Toya, possibly having been mind controlled, is now the Queen's Magicore, the power source and activation device of a Devil Golem. The Queen turns on Kou and destroys his laboratory.
In London, Atsuma is recruited into the Arsenal, the resistance group and the golem hunter, Yuki, who he encounters in Yokohama before the golem riot, joins him. After an attack from the London Knights, the arsenal suspects Raigar, a former knight and brother of Ooka, leading the attack. The others reveal to everyone that the Leader and his giggling companion are collaborators and give the Emperor of Fire's Magicore to Ooka. Ooka and Baron Hartson conspire to ruin the King's public image and revive the Emperor themselves. Karin reveals she has no choice but to merge with the Emperor, for those who have ancient blood can activate and control Devil Golems to some extent. The Emperor fights with the Queen in the city before he is defeated and consumed by Atsuma's right arm to save her.
Hearing of a secret art taught near Kyoto City, the group leaves London to go there. The Queen orders Lord Tokimune, Shogun of Kyoto, to revive the Lord of Earth and thus, they could not enter the city until tomorrow. They stay in Iwato village and meet Sayaka, Raigar's fiancee. They learn that the secret art is taught by the Ascetic Monk, who lives in the Ascetic Court, which is accessible from the village but Tokimune has the key to get in. Though he refuses an alliance with London City, he stubbornly allows them the key. Once they get it, Karin is kidnapped by ninjas, led by Oboro, a former knight.
Rescuing Karin, the group confronts Tokimune, who was collecting Ether to revive the Lord of Earth. Despite being warned by Sayaka and Tokimune not to enter the Ascetic Court, Atsuma and the others defeat Sayaka and meet the Ascetic Monk. The group is told to get a portion of the Lord of Earth's core material in order to master the art of "Gaea". Though the group succeeds, the village is attacked by ninja, and confronts Tokimune. While escaping, Tokimune is killed by Oboro who learns the location of the Magicore: inside the Shogun; he is then killed by Queen Of Ice. They fight against the near revived Lord of Earth, but when he transforms into his full form, Atsuma pulls him into his right arm.
The Lord of Earth's Magicore is drained of Ether, so they seek the help of the Sage, Raigar's teacher. But she rejects them so they wait until she cools down. The Queen of Ice appears to invite them to her ice castle north of Gravekeep Holm. Atsuma is sent into a mental vision where he retrieves a God orb, which was molded into a weapon for him. Raigar learns from the Sage that Atsuma's parents left him as a child at the base of her tower, so sick that she used the cells of an unknown Devil Golem named Infinity, to save him. She also theorizes how to separate a human Magicore from a Devil Golem; just insert its original one to set the human free.
Atsuma, Karin, Raigar and Yuki go on to defeat the Queen of Ice and save Toya; the mysterious man the group encounters several times reveals himself as Makoto soon afterwards. Atsuma has a vision and the mysterious voice then reveals itself as Infinity, who was ordered to reconstruct all matter in the world to the time of the Era of Magic. While Infinity attempts to absorb Atsuma, Toya and Makoto free him from Infinity's control. When Infinity begins to revive, Atsuma remembers the opposite word of Gaea, "Fury", and transforms into his half-golem form, combining everyone's enchanting to defeat Infinity. Yokohama is restored and the population returns as the game ends.

Characters[edit]

The protagonist of the game is Atsuma (アツマ?) (voiced by Daisuke Kishio), a student who is able to draw ether and enchantment power from others through his right arm to fight golems. Assisting him in his journey are Karin (カリン?) (voiced by Kana Ueda), a native of London City, a fighter who can use her legs to fight enemies and a member of a resistance movement; and Raigar (ライガ Raiga?) (voiced by Kenjiro Tsuda), Karin's bodyguard and another member of the resistance movement. Also assisting him is Yuki (ユウキ Yūki?) (voiced by Ryō Hirohashi), a hunter who attacks Golems to earn expensive bounties by using her two guns.


Amy Mek on Twitter: "POOR BABY->Reporter .@juliebosman Who Published Wilson Address Calling Cops Nonstop http://t.co/EF3gscfenG #Ferguson http://t.co/ll5Fj9SKnw"

Amy Mek on Twitter: "POOR BABY->Reporter .@juliebosman Who Published Wilson Address Calling Cops Nonstop http://t.co/EF3gscfenG #Ferguson http://t.co/ll5Fj9SKnw"

Will “Blexting” Help With Detroit Blight? – Next City

Will “Blexting” Help With Detroit Blight? – Next City

Spot News on Twitter: "Trying to grab dinner as more shots are being fired in #Chicagoland"

Spot News on Twitter: "Trying to grab dinner as more shots are being fired in #Chicagoland"

Uncategorized | I'm so EVIL | Page 2

Uncategorized | I'm so EVIL | Page 2



“Darkest Romance” is a story about the girl named Corazon who used to be Satan’s bride but Corazon was in love with another demon named Ram. They battled their way out of Satan’s lair just to find out the real meaning of love.


Friday, November 28, 2014

Ferguson protesters shut down malls, trains on Black Friday | Fox News

Ferguson protesters shut down malls, trains on Black Friday | Fox News




In Montreal, Jews from France see a future for themselves

In Montreal, Jews from France see a future for themselves





MotoWolfe on Twitter: "HEY #FERGUSON http://t.co/Ss8rGlZtSq"

MotoWolfe on Twitter: "HEY #FERGUSON http://t.co/Ss8rGlZtSq"

Car Mechanic Dreams Up a Tool to Ease Births - NYTimes.com

Car Mechanic Dreams Up a Tool to Ease Births - NYTimes.com



The idea came to Jorge Odón as he slept. Somehow, he said, his unconscious made the leap from a YouTube video he had just seen on extracting a lost cork from a wine bottle to the realization that the same parlor trick could save a baby stuck in the birth canal.
Diego Giudice for The New York Times
Mr. Odón’s got the idea from a method to retrieve a cork from a wine bottle.

Readers’ Comments

Readers shared their thoughts on this article.
Mr. Odón, 59, an Argentine car mechanic, built his first prototype in his kitchen, using a glass jar for a womb, his daughter’s doll for the trapped baby, and a fabric bag and sleeve sewn by his wife as his lifesaving device.
Unlikely as it seems, the idea that took shape on his counter has won the enthusiastic endorsement of the World Health Organization and major donors, and an American medical technology company has just licensed it for production.
With the Odón Device, an attendant slips a plastic bag inside a lubricated plastic sleeve around the head, inflates it to grip the head and pulls the bag until the baby emerges.
Doctors say it has enormous potential to save babies in poor countries, and perhaps to reduce cesarean section births in rich ones.
“This is very exciting,” said Dr. Mario Merialdi, the W.H.O.’s chief coordinator for improving maternal and perinatal health and an early champion of the Odón Device. “This critical moment of life is one in which there’s been very little advancement for years.”
About 10 percent of the 137 million births worldwide each year have potentially serious complications, Dr. Merialdi said. About 5.6 million babies are stillborn or die quickly, and about 260,000 women die in childbirth. Obstructed labor, which can occur when a baby’s head is too large or an exhausted mother’s contractions stop, is a major factor.
In wealthy countries, fetal distress results in a rush to the operating room. In poor, rural clinics, Dr. Merialdi said, “if the baby doesn’t come out, the woman is on her own.”
The current options in those cases are forceps — large, rounded pliers — or suction cups attached to the baby’s scalp. In untrained hands, either can cause hemorrhages, crush the baby’s head or twist its spine.
Although more testing is planned on the Odón Device, doctors said it appeared to be safe for midwives with minimal training to use.
Along the way, it has won research grants from the United States Agency for International Development and from Grand Challenges Canada. “We’ve given out $32 million for 61 different innovations, and this one is the farthest along,” said Dr. Peter A. Singer, the chief executive of Grand Challenges Canada.
The device will be manufactured by Becton, Dickinson and Company, or BD, of Franklin Lakes, N.J., which is better known for making syringes.
“My first reaction, as soon as I saw it, was positive,” said Gary M. Cohen, the company’s executive vice president for global health. It was at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, that Dr. Merialdi asked him to consider taking it on.
“Many inventions get to the prototype stage, but that’s maybe 15 percent of what needs to be done,” Mr. Cohen said. “There’s finalizing the design for manufacture, quality control, the regulatory work and clinical studies. Absent that, they don’t see the light of day.”
So far, the device has been safety-tested only on 30 Argentine women, all of whom were in hospitals, had given birth before and were in normal labor.
“I was glad they asked me, because it was for a good cause,” said Luciana Valle, a kindergarten teacher who was 31 two years ago when her son, Matteo, was one of the first babies extracted with the device. Because Matteo weighed almost nine pounds, “it really helped,” she said in a telephone interview. “His head came out on my second push.”
The W.H.O. will now oversee tests on 100 more women in normal labor in China, India and South Africa, and then on 170 women in obstructed labor.
In a telephone interview from Argentina, Mr. Odón described the origins of his idea.
He tinkers at his garage, but his previous inventions were car parts. Seven years ago, he said, employees were imitating a video showing that a cork pushed into an empty bottle can be retrieved by inserting a plastic grocery bag, blowing until it surrounds the cork, and drawing it out.
That night, he won a dinner bet on it.
At 4 a.m., he woke his wife and told her the idea that had just come to him. (His own children were born without problems, he said, but he has an aunt who suffered nerve damage from birth.)
His wife, he recalled, “said I was crazy and went back to sleep.”
The next morning, a somewhat skeptical friend introduced him to an obstetrician. “You can imagine these two guys in suits in a waiting room full of pregnant ladies,” he said.
The doctor was encouraging, so he kept working. Polyethylene replaced the bag his wife had sewn, and the jar was replaced by a plastic uterus.
With the help of a cousin, Mr. Odón met the chief of obstetrics at a major hospital in Buenos Aires. The chief had a friend at the W.H.O., who knew Dr. Merialdi, who, at a 2008 medical conference in Argentina, granted Mr. Odón 10 minutes during a coffee break.
The meeting instead lasted two hours. At the end, Dr. Merialdi declared the idea “fantastic” and arranged for testing at the Des Moines University simulation lab, which has mannequins more true-to-life than a doll and a jar.
Since then, Mr. Odón has continued to refine the device, patenting each change so he will eventually earn royalties on it.
“My daughter said, ‘And now I can have my doll back,’ ” he said.
It is too early to know what BD will charge, Mr. Cohen said, but each device should cost less than $50 to make. While the company expects to profit on all sales, it will charge poor countries less.
Dr. Merialdi said he endorsed a modest profit motive because he had seen other lifesaving ideas languish for lack of it. He cited magnesium sulfate injections, which can prevent fatal eclampsia, and corticosteroids, which speed lung development in premature infants.
“But first, this problem needed someone like Jorge,” he said. “An obstetrician would have tried to improve the forceps or the vacuum extractor, but obstructed labor needed a mechanic. And 10 years ago, this would not have been possible. Without YouTube, he never would have seen the video.”

AP Warns Black Friday Means 'Perfect Storm' of Gun Buying

AP Warns Black Friday Means 'Perfect Storm' of Gun Buying

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Hyperlexia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hyperlexia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Hyperlexic children are often fascinated by letters or numbers. They are extremely good at decoding language and thus often become very early readers. Some hyperlexic children learn to spell long words (such aselephant) before they are two years old and learn to read whole sentences before they turn three. An fMRI study of a single child showed that hyperlexia may be the neurological opposite of dyslexia.[7]

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

David Burge on Twitter: "If you think of your family's Thanksgiving dinner as a captive audience for Obamacare talking points, you might be an irredeemable asshole."

David Burge on Twitter: "If you think of your family's Thanksgiving dinner as a captive audience for Obamacare talking points, you might be an irredeemable asshole."

Dana Carvey: Liberal Satire Is Not 'Edgy,' Dennis Miller Is Edgy -- And He's 'Brutalized' For It

Dana Carvey: Liberal Satire Is Not 'Edgy,' Dennis Miller Is Edgy -- And He's 'Brutalized' For It



Via Big Hollywood, we've learned that comedian Dana Carvey discussed politics and comedy with Carl Koslowski on his podcast Kozversations. “Because of the sensitivity of having an African-American president, which is completely understandable...It took a while to find a way to satirize our president," Carvey told Kozlowski. He admitted it took time to figure out how to satirize Obama. “We were all getting to know him as a country.”
The host asked about his appearance at a Reagan Library event and whether he performs at benefits for both sides. Carvey said actor-activist Gary Sinise asked him to appear, and insisted he didn't change his jokes in any way. Then he turned to how it's "disturbing" that people on the left can't take a joke like conservatives can, and people are afraid to offend "the PC snake."
Koslowski wondered what he thought about the idea that "People often say oh yeah, there’s no way to be funny from the right, only the left can be funny." Carvey replied:
I think it’s just crazy. I think these are old tapes from Watergate or something. I don’t really understand. I grew up with Question Authority. Now if Authority is, we have an Asian-American president, a woman president, a Native American president – it’s like, I’m going to try to do my – well, What’s happened during this time that everyone’s afraid to make fun in certain areas. Because you would be labeled. You would be given a name, you know? It’s very twisted stuff.
So I think that If you live in New York or L.A. and you’re liberal and you’re playing to a liberal crowd it’s almost like a rally, and then, The New York Times is there, too, I mean, it’s just sort of – it’s when there’s brilliant people doing it, but – it’s not edgy. The true edge is like what Dennis Miller did, and he’s been brutalized for it.
Carvey said "It’s an apolitical discussion in my case. It’s just a fact that everyone knows you will get what Robin used to call the 'PC snake' on a crowd from the left, and Republicans are a little lighter about it, or conservatives."
This matches what SNL creator Lorne Michaels said about mockery earlier this year: "Democrats tend to take it personally; Republicans think it’s funny." Look no further than the SNL "fact checks" this week on Obama's illegal-immigration strategy.
Carvey added "It’s just a little disturbing...It’s different from doing comedy when you have a political agenda. I'm from the old school -- you go where the power is and you try to make fun of it," he said. "If it’s a liberal president, fine. If it’s a conservative president, fine. That’s just how we operate. But when it becomes off limits to say or do certain things without being brutalized or censored or whatever, it's unfortunate."
Carvey proclaimed “I take pride in having liberals and conservatives in the crowd.”
- See more at: http://newsbusters.org/blogs/tim-graham/2014/11/26/dana-carvey-liberal-satire-not-edgy-dennis-miller-edgy-and-hes#sthash.006fzMI6.dpuf

Walter Cronkite on Twitter: "BREAKING NEWS The Payless Shoes in Ferguson announced their entire inventory of work boots was inexplicably spared in last night's looting."

Walter Cronkite on Twitter: "BREAKING NEWS The Payless Shoes in Ferguson announced their entire inventory of work boots was inexplicably spared in last night's looting."

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Obama amnesty, Obamacare clash: Businesses have $3,000 incentive to hire illegals - Washington Times

Obama amnesty, Obamacare clash: Businesses have $3,000 incentive to hire illegals - Washington Times



Under the president’s new amnesty, businesses will have a $3,000-per-employee incentive to hire illegal immigrants over native-born workers because of a quirk of Obamacare.
President Obama’s temporary amnesty, which lasts three years, declares up to 5 million illegal immigrants to be lawfully in the country and eligible for work permits, but it still deems them ineligible for public benefits such as buying insurance on Obamacare’s health exchanges.


Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/nov/25/obama-amnesty-obamacare-clash-businesses-have-3000/#ixzz3K8dmvsIS 
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

National debt is greatest threat to U.S.’s security

National debt is greatest threat to U.S.’s security

Chuck Nellis on Twitter: "Obama showed his community organizer ass last night talking about 'justified anger', that A-hole gave a green light to violent riots. :("

Chuck Nellis on Twitter: "Obama showed his community organizer ass last night talking about 'justified anger', that A-hole gave a green light to violent riots. :("

Josh Jordan on Twitter: "Natalie DuBose sold her cakes at flea markets to save up to own her own shop. Tonight it was attacked in #Ferguson. http://t.co/WOKzgiSuKV"

Josh Jordan on Twitter: "Natalie DuBose sold her cakes at flea markets to save up to own her own shop. Tonight it was attacked in #Ferguson. http://t.co/WOKzgiSuKV"

Monday, November 24, 2014

TheVine - Microsoft's headquarters are now defended by a fleet of robots - Life & pop culture, untangled

TheVine - Microsoft's headquarters are now defended by a fleet of robots - Life & pop culture, untangled



Microsoft's offices are now defended by a fleet of robots



Microsoft, the private vault where Bill Gates stores his immense fortune, used to have the inexhaustible defence of lawyers. Now they have the inexhaustible defence of robots. Literally robots. We are living in science fiction.

Manufactured by a company called Knightscope, the K5 security bots look like little rubbish bin pods on wheels embedded with tiny HD cameras. Alternatively, they look like proto-Daleks designed by Fisher-Price. They are terrifyingly useful. The K5s have GPS and 3D mapping functions, thermal imaging and night vision cameras, eye scanners, audio recorders, biological and chemical and radiation detectors, and can conduct behavioural analysis. They can scan car number plates and check if they're stolen and alert the police. They can see someone holding a gun and alert the police. They can even tell the weather.
And in the future, they're going to be equipped with tasers.
"How could this possibly go wrong?" you're wondering. Except no you're not, 'cos it's pretty friggin obvious.
Have a look at Microsoft's new army of unfeeling death machines below.

Vikings - Season 3 Trailer - Comic Con 2014

Latino Leaders: Obama’s Executive Order Doesn’t Solve Immigration Problem | CNS News

Latino Leaders: Obama’s Executive Order Doesn’t Solve Immigration Problem | CNS News




Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Existential Buddhist | dharma without dogma

The Existential Buddhist | dharma without dogma



Governments can violate the Second Precept through unjust confiscatory taxation.  Zen Master Hakuin (1686-1769) railed against the typical Japanese Daimyo (feudal lord) of his day who lived:
“a life of the greatest luxury… with never a thought of the difficulties of the common people under him. From the blood and sweat he wrings from them he is able to fill his tables with fine sake….  As there is never enough money to satisfy such appetites, he ends up dispatching merciless ministers….  Not only do officials reckon the tax rate yearly, they also raise the rate two or three times during the same year.” [1]
Closer to our own time, the American revolution was fought over taxation without representation, and some present day third-world countries are governed by oligarchies so corrupt they can only be called “kleptocracies.”

Vajrayana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vajrayana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



In the 9th or 10th century seven famous Tantric maidens appeared in the Patna (Patnagarh) region, which was then called Kuānri-Pātaṇā. These maidens are popularly known as Sāta Bhauni (seven sisters), namely, Gyanadei Maluni, Luhakuti, Luhuruṇi, Nitei Dhobani, Sukuti Chamaruṇi, Patrapindhi Sabaruṇi, Gangi Gauduṇi and sua Teluṇi. They hailed from the castes which were considered the lower castes of society, and were followers of Lakshminkara. Because of their miraculous power and feats, they were later deified and worshiped by the locals.

Great Anti-Buddhist Persecution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Great Anti-Buddhist Persecution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The persecution sought to return monks and nuns to the ranks of tax-paying commoners engaged in useful economic activity.

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton



If one doesn’t collect taxes which are reasonable,
and not take equally from the rich and poor
according to their situation, is that just?
From all subjects who pay taxes
take in accord with their land,
the season, and their wealth, without harming their home.
Do not burden them unbearably.
In the manner of a cow eating grass,
one shouldn’t destroy the roots.

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton



Your Majesty, you levy harsh taxes
And punish the innocent for no reason.
Infatuated with your sovereignty,
You never heed
The future effects of your karmas.
Surata obviously objects to the king’s high taxes because they are a result of his greed—for power and for money—and also because they hurt Sravasti’s citizens. Nagarjuna objects to high taxes in Ratnavali 4:252-253 almost entirely for the latter reason :
Provide stricken farmers
With seeds and sustenance.
Eliminate high taxes levied by the previous monarch.
Reduce the tax rate on harvests.
Protect the poor from the pain of wanting your wealth.
Set up no new tolls and reduce those that are heavy.
Also free traders from other areas from the afflictions
That come from waiting at your door.

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton



The focus of the first line—especially with Asvaghosa’s emphasis on intention—seems to be not on taxes, per se, but on greed for them. 

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton



now seems like a perfect time to survey what Buddhist thinkers have had to say. Rather than serving as a liability, these thinkers’ cultural, political, and historical distance from us can give us some much-needed perspective. Let’s take a look.
In Buddhacarita 2:43, Asvaghosa praises the Buddha’s father, King Suddhodana:
He did not wish to raise inordinate taxes,
he did not wish to take what belonged to others,
he did not wish to reveal his foes’ adharma,
he did not wish to carry anger in his heart.

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton

Birth, Old Age, Sickness, Death, and Taxes: The Buddha on Fiscal Policy | Joshua Eaton



MOST Americans—even many Buddhist Americans—think of Buddhism as a quietistic spirituality focused on either individual peace of mind or complete transcendence of the social and material worlds. The famous sociologist Max Weber called it a “specifically unpolitical and anti-political status religion,” and that’s the impression that has pretty much stuck ever since. So, it might surprise many people to learn just how preoccupied Buddhist texts are with at least one mundane, bread-and-butter public policy issue: taxes.
These texts also disabuse us of another misconception common among American Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike—that Buddhism is liberal. Robert Thurman argues, for example, that Nagarjuna’s Ratnavali promotes a “dharmic socialism” leading to a “welfare state;” but Nagarjuna is, along with the rest of these thinkers, far subtler—and far less conventional—than any party line would allow.

Imagine a World Without Taxes | The Mark News

Imagine a World Without Taxes | The Mark News



You know, there’s two schools in economics on this. One is that there are some good taxes and the other is that no taxes are good taxes. I’m in the latter category. I don’t believe that any taxes are good taxes.
-Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, July 2009, G8 address in Italy

In a World Without Borders: The Impact of Taxes on Internet Commerce

In a World Without Borders: The Impact of Taxes on Internet Commerce



The results are quite robust and cannot be explained by unobserved technological sophistication, shopping costs, or other alternative explanations. The magnitudes in the paper suggest that applying existing sales taxes to Internet commerce might reduce the number of online buyers by up to 24 percent.




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