body~politic

~~~~~~~~~> Does DEBT  become SERFDOM ?

Tweet me @ColonialSerf, and let me know, and I'll share the answers HERE!!!

Thursday, December 3, 2009

The FrogPad Solution

http://www.frogpad.com/









The FrogPad Solution

FrogPad is a portable one-handed keyboard. It's practical, simple, and intuitive, 20-key text/numeric data entry design uses patented algorithms and ergonomic optimization providing all of the functionality of a standard keyboard. The full-size keys ensure accuracy, ease of use, and speed for all desktop and mobile computing applications.

FrogPad is available in left-hand and right-hand configurations for optimal efficiency. USB models can replace any standard USB keyboard. Bluetooth models use standard HID drivers and work with Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and all PDA's running Windows Mobile 5 or 6.

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Wednesday, December 2, 2009

diatribe

Main Entry: di·a·tribe
Pronunciation: \ˈdī-ə-ˌtrīb\
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin diatriba, from Greek diatribē pastime, discourse, from diatribein to spend (time), wear away, from dia- + tribein to rub — more at throw
Date: 1581
1 archaic : a prolonged discourse
2 : a bitter and abusive speech or writing
3 : ironic or satirical criticism

DO SMOKING GUNS CAUSE GLOBAL WARMING, TOO?

http://www.anncoulter.com/


DO SMOKING GUNS CAUSE GLOBAL WARMING, TOO?
December 2, 2009


As we now know (and by "we" I mean "everyone with access to the Internet"), the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit (CRU) has just been caught ferociously manipulating the data about the Earth's temperature.

Recently leaked e-mails from the "scientists" at CRU show that, when talking among themselves, they forthrightly admit to using a "trick" to "hide the decline" in the Earth's temperature since 1960 -- as one e-mail says. Still another describes their manipulation of the data thus: "[W]e can have a proper result, but only by including a load of garbage!"

Am I just crazy from the heat or were they trying to deceive us?

Global warming cheerleaders in the media were quick to defend the scandalous e-mails, explaining that, among scientists, the words "trick," "hide the decline" and "garbage" do not mean "trick," "hide the decline" and "garbage." These words actually mean "onion soup," "sexual submissive" and "Gary, Ind."

(Boy, it must be great to be able to redefine words right in the middle of a debate.)

Also, of course, the defenders said that the words needed to be placed "in context" -- the words' check was in the mail, and they'd like to spend more time with their families.

I have placed the words in context and it turns out what they mean is: gigantic academic fraud.

The leaked e-mail exchanges also show the vaunted "scientists" engaging in a possibly criminal effort to delete their own smoking-gun e-mails in response to a Freedom of Information request. Next, the fanatics will be telling us that "among scientists," this behavior does not indicate knowledge of guilt.

If I recall correctly, their next move should be to fire the special prosecutor late Saturday night.

These e-mails aren't a tempest in a teapot. They are evidence of pervasive fraud by a massively influential institution that has dominated news coverage of global warming.

CRU was regularly cited as the leading authority on "global climate analysis" -- including by the very news outlets that are burying the current scandal, such as The New York Times and The Washington Post. The CRU alone received more than $23 million in taxpayer funds for its work on global warming.

Having claimed to have collected the most complete data on the Earth's temperature for the last half century, the CRU's summary of that data was used by the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for its 2007 report demanding that we adopt a few modest lifestyle changes, such as abolishing modern technology, reverting to hunter/gatherer status and taxing ourselves into servitude.

But then last weekend -- in the middle of the "Let's Cook the Books!" e-mail scandal -- the CRU said that all its data on the Earth's temperature since 1960 had been irretrievably "lost." (Although I suspect "overcooked" might be a more apt term.)

The way this episode is unfolding, the environmentalists may be forced to drop their phantom threat of global warming and go back to the phantom threat of global cooling.

Most disturbingly, the CRU-affiliated "scientists" were caught red-handed conspiring to kill the careers and reputations of scientists who dissented from the religion of global warming. Indignant that scientific journals were publishing papers skeptical of global warming, the cult members plotted to get editors ousted and the publications discredited.

This sabotage of global warming dissenters may be more galling than their manipulation of the data. Until now, the global warming cult's sole argument has been to demand that everyone shut up in response to the "scientific consensus" that human activity was causing global warming.

That's their idea of a free and open debate.

It's always the same thing with primitive people -- voodoo practitioners, rain dancers and liberals. In lieu of facts, debate and a weighing of the evidence, religious fanatics respond to all counterarguments by invoking a higher authority: the witch doctor, a "scientific consensus," "the Constitution" or "historians are agreed."

Liberals won't tell us why Congress passed a law outlawing incandescent lightbulbs by 2014 -- a bill solemnly delivered to the president in a Prius hybrid (making it the slowest-moving bill in U.S. history). Instead, they tell us there's a "scientific consensus" that we have to use fluorescent lightbulbs or we'll all die.

They won't tell us why Ten Commandments monuments must be stripped from every public space in America. Instead, they tell us "the Constitution" says so (according to the high priests who interpret it to mean things the document doesn't remotely say).

They won't tell us what Sen. Joe McCarthy lied about. They say: Historians are agreed that McCarthy was a liar. (These are the same historians who also stated as fact that "few American Communists were spies" -- until decrypted Soviet cables proved that the Communist Party was awash with Soviet spies.)

This is precisely what liberals accuse Christians of doing, but which Christians never do. We don't cite the Bible as authority -- and then refuse to let anyone read it. We certainly don't claim to have "lost" it, so you can't check for yourself. But that's exactly what the CRU has done with its secret data allegedly showing a warming Earth.

Also, biblical data on the great flood and Noah's ark have held up remarkably well.

Even if the Earth were warming -- which apparently it is not -- the idea that humans using energy-efficient lightbulbs would alter the temperature of the globe is approximately as plausible as the Aztecs' belief that they were required to wrench the beating heart out of living, breathing humans in order to keep the sun on its path.

Sadly, the "human sacrifice deniers" lost the argument to Aztec CRU scientists, who explained that there was a "scientific consensus" on the benefits of ritual murder.

But at least the Aztecs only slaughtered tens of thousands of humans in the name of "climate change." The global warming cultists want us all dead.

COPYRIGHT 2009 ANN COULTER

Survey reveals a perception gap between what outsourcing industry is offering and what Private Equity CFOs are seeing

http://www.mourant.com/content/1009/index.html



Survey reveals a perception gap between what outsourcing industry is offering and what Private Equity CFOs are seeing

Mourant International Finance Administration, one of the world’s leading fund administrators, has taken the initiative to investigate what concerns exist within the private equity industry in a survey of CFOs conducted by the leading journal Private Equity News. The purpose of this survey was to share intelligence across the industry about views of future regulation and how the use of professional third party fund administrators might help to meet the challenges.

The survey revealed that as fund structures have become more complicated, administering funds has become more complex and sophisticated. The CFOs job has also evolved, leaving less time to oversee the day-to-day responsibilities of the fund. To see the findings of the survey click here.

Oliver Smiddy, associate editor of Private Equity News magazine, commented:

"A raft of potentially punitive legislative measures looms on the horizon, making the role of the CFO increasingly fraught. Outsourcing is one way to reduce the burden, but the survey has revealed that many firms are unwilling to take a step viewed as a relinquishing of control in some quarters."

The survey respondents revealed that two-thirds of those who administer in-house have not even considered outsourcing, which would indicate a perception gap between what the outsourcing industry is offering and what CFOs are seeing. Also, most firms that do outsource their fund administration seemed to be satisfied with their current providers with 93% rating their current providers satisfactory.

Iain Stokes, group managing director of Mourant International Finance Administration, explained:

"Outsourcing fund administration has great potential to add value to a private equity business. It has become more specialized with administrators able to offer tailored services since they have an embedded skill-set to develop proactive solutions. Administrators also have the benefit of working with a wide range of funds using diverse structures across many jurisdictions and are able to use that experience for the benefit of their clients. The outsourcing industry must continue to earn the right to be a trusted partner to many more CFOs as challenges in our industry become more prevalent. I believe outsourcing will increasingly be seen as the obvious choice for a growing number of CFOs and their funds’ investors."






truce

Main Entry: 1truce
Pronunciation: \ˈtrüs\
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English trewes, plural of trewe agreement, from Old English trēow fidelity; akin to Old English trēowe faithful — more at true
Date: 13th century
1 : a suspension of fighting especially of considerable duration by agreement of opposing forces : armistice, cease-fire
2 : a respite especially from a disagreeable or painful state or action

Best Wishes,

Monday, November 30, 2009

World carbon emissions overshoot "budget": PwC

http://www.reuters.com/article/environmentNews/idUSTRE5B000U20091201



By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent

OSLO (Reuters) - The world has emitted extra greenhouse gases this century equivalent to the annual totals of China and the United States above a maximum for avoiding the worst of climate change, a study estimated on Tuesday.

Global accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers said in the report that almost all major nations, including European Union countries that pride themselves on climate policies, were lagging since 2000 in a push for low-carbon growth.

It said the world was already far above a "budget" of total emissions of 1,300 billion tons of carbon dioxide from 2000-50 which it estimated as the maximum permissible while avoiding the worst of climate change.

"For 2000-08, the cumulative global budget overshoot, or 'carbon debt', is estimated at around 13 billion tons of carbon dioxide -- roughly equivalent to the annual carbon emissions of China and the United States combined in 2008," it said.

China and the United States are the top world emitters of greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels. A conference in Copenhagen from December 7 to 18 will try to work out a new U.N. pact to curb rising emissions.

"If you stay on this path the entire carbon budget will be used by about 2034, about 16 years early," John Hawksworth, head of macroeconomics at PwC, told Reuters of the report, based on a new PwC Low Carbon Economy Index.

CARBON INTENSITY

The index is a nation-by-nation tracker of efforts to improve "carbon intensity" -- the amount of carbon dioxide emitted per dollar of economic output -- rather than the usual yardstick of changes in overall national emissions.

So far this century, the world had improved carbon intensity by only about 0.8 percent a year, it said.

"To get back on track, world carbon intensity would have to fall by about 3 percent a year, four times the speed at the moment," said Richard Gledhill, global leader of climate change at PwC. "That shows the policy challenges."

China's rate of cutting carbon intensity was 0.7 percent a year from 2000-08, the United States 2.2 percent, the European Union 1.8 percent and India 2.1 percent. All were lagging the rates set by PwC for their carbon budgets.

It estimated a budget of 1,300 billion tons would give a fair chance of limiting global warming to a 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) rise over pre-industrial levels, widely seen as a threshold for "dangerous" change.

PwC calculated the world would have to cut carbon intensity by about 85 percent between 2008 and 2050 to avoid the worst of climate change such as more powerful cyclones, desertification, wildfires and rising sea levels.

China last week set itself a goal of cutting its carbon intensity by between 40 and 45 percent by 2020, compared with 2005 levels. Hawksworth estimated that would still allow China's overall emissions to rise by 65 percent in the period.

Former U.S. President George W. Bush also once set a carbon intensity goal that let U.S. emissions rise.

(Editing by Andrew Dobbie)











The Swiss minaret ban and other trends for Islam in Europe

[csl. notice that the pro-minaret poster that says 'vote yes'('Stopp Ja', in Swiss) has a woman's face covered, the blatant display of woman's oppression.]

The Swiss minaret ban and other trends for Islam in Europe
Posted by: Tom Heneghan

minarets-trainSwitzerland’s vote to ban minarets on mosques there raises the question of whether anything similar might happen elsewhere in Europe. Researching this for an analysis of the vote today, I found experts distinguished between actually banning an Islamic symbol such as the minaret and using the minaret example to fan voters’ fears and boost a party’s chances at the polls. It seems Switzerland’s trademark direct democracy system makes it possibly the only country in Europe where both seem possible right now.

(Photo: Vote “yes” posters in Zurich’s main train station, 26 Oct 2009/Arnd Wiegmann)

This distinction could become more important in coming months as far-right parties, as they are expected to do, try to exploit the minaret ban to rally support for their anti-immigration policies. The Swiss far right has already suggested going for a ban of full facial veils (aka burqas and niqabs) next. Marine Le Pen, deputy leader of France’s National Front, has called for a referendum in France not only on minarets, but also on immigration and a wide array of other issues linked to Muslims. Filip Dewinter, head of Belgium’s Vlaams Belang, said he wanted to change zoning laws there to ban buildings that damage the cultural identity of the surrounding neighbourhood”. It remains to be seen how far they can get with these demands.

At the same time, the consensus reaction from politicians and the press across Europe today was critical of the Swiss vote. Most of the excited calls for more action come from fringe parties the majority parties keep at a distance (except the Northern League, which is part of Silvio Berlusconi’s government in Italy). Referendums are not as easy to stage in other European countries and are even banned in Germany, where the up-and-coming team of Hitler and Goebbels used them before 1933 to rally support for the Nazi Party.

Muslims in Europe were naturally shocked by the vote and worried about what might come next. The possibility of further pressure on them cannot be ignored because globalisation is forcing European societies to deal with increasing religious, ethnic and cultural diversity. While not denying that pressure, which naturally does not make life welcoming for Muslims here, let’s look at a few trends that seem to get drowned out in the headlines.

cologne-heightsThe first is that mosques are now part of the European landscape. There were some quite raw confrontations over them in the 1980s and 1990s in the countries with bigger and older Muslim communities such as France, Britain and Germany. There are still some heated debates, as the uproar over the plan for a large Turkish mosque in Cologne showed. But for the most part, those mosque projects have gone ahead. In the Cologne case, despite repeated criticism and far-right protests, the new mosque will have two 55-meter minarets — tall for an average church, but nothing like the 157-meter spires above the city’s famous Catholic cathedral.

(Image: Comparitive heights of Cologne cathedral and planned mosque/DITIB)

Just like a bell tower or spire is normal but not necessary for a church, the minaret and the loud public call to prayer — both regular features in Muslim countries — are optional elements for mosques. Almost no mosques in Europe use loudspeakers for the adhan, preferring to keep the call to prayer within the mosque, and many of them do without a minarets or agree to shorten their planned heights to make them fit into the local cityscape. These details can be negotiated constructively, if both sides — repeat, both sides — bring the necessary good will to the table.

Another fact is that there is now roughly enough mosque space for Europe’s Muslims, according to recent estimates, so the phase of active expansion of mosques and prayer rooms, which created the initial tensions with majority populations, may be waning. In some areas, a new one has started as Muslim communities take root and want to “trade up” from makeshift prayer rooms to better and more visible mosques. That can create new tensions. This was the case in Cologne, where Turkish-German Muslims are swapping a mosque set up in a former factory for the elegant new purpose-built mosque that caused so much controversy. But these controversies take place in cities where many locals now know some Muslim neighbours and take their side in the conflict. Do difficulties remain? Sure. But do situations develop? Certainly. Many critical commentators don’t take that dynamic enough into account.

conflict-over-mosquesOne researcher who does see the changes going on is Stefano Allievi, an Italian sociologist who has made a name as a leading observer of Islam in Europe. Earlier this month, he published the 102-page report that I mention in my analysis, Conflicts over Mosques in Europe: Policy Issues and Trends. He sees the recent rise in populist agitation against Islam in Europe and thinks it could increase. But beneath the surface, he finds interesting signs of integration of Islam into European societies. A lot of this is happening at the grass-roots level, below the radar of most headline writers, but it is taking place. Take a close look at his report (here in PDF) for a better idea of how this is playing out.

Probably because reporting on Islam in Europe rather than theorising about it is part of my job, I have never been convinced by the alarmist “Eurabia” thesis that Muslim immigration will turn Europe Islamic within a few generations, subjecting the non-Muslim local population to a religious subjugation called “dhimmitude”. Although it is much more sophisticated, I also don’t agree either with Christopher Caldwell’s book Reflections on the Revolution in Europe, which sees an army of fervent Muslim believers challenging a sceptical and spineless majority of post-Christian Europeans. As the prominent British Islam scholar Malise Ruthven put it in the latest New York Review of Books, Caldwell “takes an essentialist perspective of a primordial religion impervious to change, as if he were oblivious of the way that essentialist views of religion have long been under sustained intellectual attack”. He rejects what the British scholar Aziz al-Azmeh calls “the cliché of a homogenous collectivity innocent of modernity, cantankerously or morosely obsessed with prayer, fasting, veiling (and) medieval social and penal arrangements”.

The integration of Islam in Europe has not been easy and will continue to create tensions and misunderstandings for some time to come, on both sides of the supposed divide. But this is a dynamic process that changes all actors involved, sometimes in contradictory ways, and it is better reflected in Allievi’s long report than in many of the short but alarming stories most readers will find.

The superheroes of Japan who predated Superman and Batman

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/herocomplex/2009/11/the-early-origins-of-anime-and-manga-traced-to-street-theater-of-japan.html


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Hero Complex

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The superheroes of Japan who predated Superman and Batman

November 29, 2009 | 6:38 am

Hero Complex contributor Liesl Bradner offers an intriguing look back at a forgotten age of heroics in Japan...

Bluegoldenbat_p142

Five years before Lee Falk’s masked-man adventures with “The Phantom” began in newspapers, a hero called Golden Bat was saving damsels in distress in the streets of Depression-era Japan. He was first seen in 1931 (seven years before Superman first took flight and eight before that Gotham City fellow who dressed like a bat) and his exploits were told in kamishibai, which was street theater that used painted illustrations.

Author Eric P. Nash examines the little-known art form and predecessor to modern-day anime and manga in his recent book “Manga Kamishibai: The Art of Japanese Paper Theater.” I wrote about the book and this long-gone street entertainment for Culture Monster, the arts blog for the Los Angeles Times. Here's a bit from that piece that describes the street performance:

It was the simple clacking of two wooden sticks on a street corner that signaled to children the start of kamishibai, a popular pastime during Depression-era Japan. ... Storytellers would travel from town to town with their butai (miniature stage) on the back of a bike. The setup was reminiscent of a Punch and Judy show, but instead of puppets the narrator would slide a series of poster boards with watercolor illustrations in and out of the box. He would act out the script, which was written on cards placed on the back of a board.

53031_Manga_078

You can read the rest of that piece right here. For Hero Complex readers, it's intriguing to see the parallels and unexpected overlap with U.S. comics and newspaper strips. With the series of images presented on the butai, kamishibai artists and writers worked in a similar fashion to classic comic strips.

Although he resembles Captain America’s nemesis Red Skull, Golden Bat has more in common with a certain Man of Steel. Like Superman, he flies, wears a red cape, flexes superhuman muscles and gets away from it all in a fortress of solitude (the Bat's, though, is in the Japanese Alps).

Golden Bat’s creator, Takeo Nagamatsu, was thought to have been inspired by Lon Chaney in “Phantom of the Opera.

Other characters in the vintage Japanese medium possess eerie similarities to icons of American comic books. The villain Pale Rider, for instance, has a mask that looks like a cross between Batman’s symbol and the Joker’s grinning, chalk-white face. There's also a dead ringer for the Starwars37creature from the Black Lagoon in "Prince Gamma vs. the Giant Alien." In one illustration from a chapter of Prince Gamma, the title letters slant away from the viewer as they did in old Flash Gordon serials, which, of course, inspired George Lucas' rolling opening credits in the "Star Wars" films.

Kamishibai died in about 1952, with the introduction of TV into popular culture. Many of the form’s writers and artists then migrated into manga, such as Astro Boy creator Osamu Tezuka, known to many as the “Godfather of Manga.” -- Liesl Bradner

RECENT AND RELATED

Manga origins The Depression-era origins of manga and anime

Nic Cage on "the sadness" of Astro Boy

Kenneth Turan: "Ponyo" is must-see

Hayao Miyazaki, beyond good and evil

Images, from top: Golden Bat, Pale Rider, Prince Gamma and Jungle Boy. All from "Manga Kamishibai" by Eric P. Nash / Abrams ComicArts 2009


Related stories

Demjanjuk trial shows double standards, lawyer says

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8387091.stm




Demjanjuk trial shows double standards, lawyer says

Advertisement

Martin Haas, who lost relatives in the concentration camps, says Mr Demjanjuk's behaviour was "theatre-like"

A lawyer for John Demjanjuk, accused of helping to murder 27,900 Jews at a Nazi death camp, has accused German prosecutors of double standards.

Mr Demjanjuk, 89, denies he was a guard at Sobibor camp, in wartime Poland.

As the case began in Munich, his legal team said in previous cases Germans assigned to the camp had been cleared.

The Ukraine-born accused, who was extradited to Germany from the US in May, was twice carried into court, first in a wheelchair then a stretcher.

Doctors have said Mr Demjanjuk is in poor health, and asked that hearings be limited to two 90-minute sessions a day.

Over 60 years after the end of World War II, this may be Germany's last big war crimes trial.

'Under duress'

But the BBC's Oana Lungescu in Munich says that, as the first to focus on a low-ranking foreigner rather than a senior Nazi commander, it breaks new legal ground.

AT THE SCENE
Oana Lungescu
Oana Lungescu, BBC, Munich

After a delay of 70 minutes John Demjanjuk entered the court in a wheelchair, wearing glasses and a dark blue baseball cap, and covered in a blanket. He mumbled at first , but then settled down to listen to a Ukrainian interpreter - his eyes apparently shut.

His lawyer immediately went on the offensive - accusing German judges of double standards. "How can John Demjanjuk, a Ukrainian prisoner of war, be found guilty," he asked, "when several German SS officers, who served in the death camps, have been previously acquitted."

Facing Thomas Blatt, an 82-year-old survivor of Sobibor, the defence lawyer said he and John Demjanjuk were both victims.

Defence lawyer Ulrich Busch said it should never have gone to trial.

"How can you say that those who gave the orders were innocent... and the one who received the orders is guilty?" Mr Busch told the court.

"There is a moral and legal double standard being applied today."

Mr Busch has said even if it could be proved his client - who was captured by the Nazis while fighting in the Soviet army - was in Sobibor, he would have been there under duress.

A retired Ohio car-worker, Mr Demjanjuk stands accused of having helped the Nazi death factory to function.

Prosecutors say he was a guard who pushed thousands of Jews to their deaths in the gas chambers at Sobibor.

Lawyers for Mr Demjanjuk - who denies being at the death camp - say he will not speak at all during the case.

The trial is expected to last until May and, if found guilty, Mr Demjanjuk could be sentenced to 15 years in jail.

If Mr Demjanjuk is acquitted it is not clear where he will go as he has been stripped of his US citizenship.

A leading French Nazi-hunter voiced disappointment over the case as he said the accused would only have been a minor figure.

Serge Klarsfeld told AFP news agency on Monday: "It's a bit disappointing - a bedridden non-German, occupying a subordinate position and who would have died of hunger in a prison camp" if he had refused to serve as a guard.

'Hollywood, not Sobibor'

Mr Demjanjuk arrived on Monday in an ambulance at the courtroom, which was crowded with people, including journalists and relatives of Holocaust survivors.

DEMJANJUK - PROSECUTION CHALLENGES
89 years old, health failing
Described by prosecution as low-ranking guard
No death camp survivors to testify against him personally
Prosecutors relying heavily on about 30 joint plaintiffs and circumstantial evidence

A pale Mr Demjanjuk, his eyes closed for much of the time, was taken into court in a wheelchair.

A doctor who examined Mr Demjanjuk two hours before proceedings began said his vital signs were stable.

After the first session, the accused was returned to court lying on a stretcher and covered in blankets.

Doctors ordered the second session to be cut short after examining Mr Demjanjuk, who was complaining of pain.

But Efraim Zuroff, director of the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center, said: "Demjanjuk put on a great act. He should have gone to Hollywood, not Sobibor."

'No revenge'

Prosecutors say statements from a now-dead Ukrainian place Mr Demjanjuk at Sobibor.

DEMJANJUK CASE TIMELINE
World War II-era military service pass for John Demjanjuk, which his defence lawyers say is a fake
1952: Gains entry into the US, claiming he spent most of war as German POW
1977: First charged with war crimes, accused of being "Ivan the Terrible"
1981: Stripped of US citizenship
1986: Extradited to Israel
1988: Sentenced to death by Jerusalem court
1993: Israeli Supreme Court overturns conviction, ruling that he is not Ivan the Terrible
2002: Loses US citizenship after a judge said there was proof he worked at Nazi camps
2005: A judge rules in favour of deportation to his native Ukraine
2009: Germany issues arrest warrant; deported by US and charged

The statements - which the defence says are inconsistent - say he "participated in the mass killing of Jews".

There are no living witnesses in this case, but over 30 people listed as joint plaintiffs are expected to testify about what happened at Sobibor, described by investigators as hell on earth.

Two are camp survivors, others lost relatives or their entire families among the 250,000 people murdered there.

One of the plaintiffs, Sobibor survivor Thomas Blatt, told journalists on his way into court he was not looking for revenge.

"I'm here to tell the way it was years ago, I don't know Demjanjuk in person," he said.

This is the second time John Demjanjuk has appeared in court.

Two decades ago, he was sentenced to death in Israel, convicted of being Ivan the Terrible, a notoriously sadistic guard at the Treblinka death camp.

But that ruling was overturned after new evidence showed that another Ukrainian was probably responsible.

Sunday, November 29, 2009

Chicago Style Bibliography

http://library.menloschool.org/chicago.html



Chicago Style Bibliography



Click here for formatting conventions.
Click here for note guidelines.

Interview

To cite a source from a subscription database:
When citing online sources always check the information to see the form in which the document originally existed (e.g. book, magazine, article in an anthology, Congressional record, speech, encyclopedia).

  • Cite the information FIRST as originally published.
  • Then cite the ACCESS information—how you obtained the information online (did you go
    directly to the site or use a subscription database?) The path to finding the information should be very clear.

General Bibliography Format:

  • Print your last name and page number in the top right hand corner of the page
  • Center "Bibliography" at the top of the page (don't put it in quotation marks, use bold, underline it, or use a different font. Do not use "Works Cited".)
  • List entries in alphabetical order- do not number them.
  • If an author is unknown, use the title to alphabetize. Be sure to ignore the words “The” “A” and “An” if the title begins with these words. Ex: “The Sinking of the Titanic”, if it has no author, should be alphabetized under “Sinking”.
  • Keep capitalization consistent. Capitalize each word in a title, even if the title in the original article is not capitalized.
  • Double space between sources, single space within each entry
  • Indent the second and all succeeding lines for each entry
  • Use "n.p." to indicate "no place" when there is no location given for the publisher.

top

Citing a book (print)
  • Author’s last name, first name, followed by a period
  • Title of the book, italicized or underlined, followed by a period
  • City of publication, followed by a colon
  • Name of the publisher, followed by a comma
  • Date of publication, followed by a period.

example:
Waterman, Jonathan. Arctic Crossing: A Journey Through the Northwest
Passage and Inuit Culture
. New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2001.

Citing an online book
  • Author’s last name, first name, followed by a period
  • Title of the book, italicized or underlined, followed by a period
  • City of publication, followed by a colon
  • Name of the publisher, followed by a comma
  • Date of publication, followed by a period
  • Write: Available from: and the title of the site, followed by a comma
  • Host
  • Date accessed followed by a period

example:
Honey, Maureen. Bitter Fruit: African American Women in World War II. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 1999. Available from: Peninsula Library System NetLibrary, (accessed 22 March 2005).
top

Citing a book with multiple authors

Use the same format as with a single author, but begin with the name of the first author listed on the title page, last name then first, then list the names of the other authors in normal order. Use "'and" rather than "&" between the authors.

  • Author’s last name, first name, followed by the remaining author(s), followed by a a period
  • Title of the book, italicized or underlined, followed by a period
  • City of publication, followed by a colon
  • Name of the publisher, followed by a comma
  • Date of publication, followed by a period.

example:
Bradley, James, Ron Powers, and Susan Spark. Flags of Our Fathers.
New York: Bantam Books, 2002.

Citing a print encyclopedia

Encyclopedias are generally cited in notes rather than in a bibliography. Citations for well-known encyclopedias such as World Book or Britannica do not require publication information, but any edition after the first should be indicated. Citation for a lesser known encycopedia should include publication information before the s.v.

  • Title of encyclopedia in italics, followed by a period and a space
  • Edition if known, abbreviated, followed by a period and a space
  • The letters s.v. (meaning "under the word") followed by a space
  • The heading for the encyclopedic entry, followed by a period and within quotation marks.

examples:
World Book Encyclopedia. 2003 ed. s.v. "Industrial Revolution."

Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. Ed. David Levinson, Karen Christenson (New York: Charles
Scribner's Sons, 2002). s.v. "Indo-China War."

Citing an online encyclopedia

Encyclopedias are generally cited in notes rather than in a bibliography. Citations for well-known encyclopedias such as World Book or Britannica do not require publication information, but any edition after the first should be indicated. Citation for a lesser known encycopedia should include publication information before the s.v. If the encyclopedia is available through a subscription, include the url of the organization providing access. If the encyclopedia is freely available on the Internet, include the url of the encyclopedia itself.

  • Title of encyclpedia in italics, followed by a period and a space
  • Edition if known, abbreviated, followed by a period and a space
  • The letters s.v. (meaning "under the word") followed by a space
  • The heading for the encyclopedic entry, followed by a period and within quotation marks
  • The words Available from followed by a colon
  • If a paid subscription, provide the name of the sponsoring organization (abbreviate Library as Lib.)
  • URL of sponsoring organization, or of free online encyclopedia, within brackets, followed by a space
  • Access date within parentheses, followed by a period.

examples:
Encyclopedia Britannica Online. s.v. "John Lennon." Available from: Menlo School Lib.
(accessed 8 December 2005).

Columbia Encyclopedia. 6th ed.. s.v. "Beatles, The." Available from Bartleby (accessed 8 December 2005).

Citing a film or video

Citation of films follows the style used for books, with the addition of medium type. A portion of a video is cited as a chapter of a book, using chapter numbers that are provided if the medium is DVD, or a description if the medium is VHS. Additional material that is included on a DVD is cited as a chapter.

  • Note number followed by a period and a space
  • Author's last name, first name (if known), followed by a period and a space
  • Title of film, in italics, followed by a comma and a space
  • Medium type, followed by a period and a space
  • Directed by followed by director's first name last name, followed by a period and a space
  • Original publication year if this is a reissue, followed by a comma and a space
  • City of publication, followed by a colon and a space
  • Name of studio or production company followed by a comma and a space
  • Year of publication, followed by a period.

example (entire movie):
Plan 9 From Outer Space, DVD. Directed by Edward D. Wood, Jr. 1959, Chatsworth, CA: Image
Entertainment, 2000.

example (portion of a movie):
"Escape from Atlanta." Gone With the Wind, DVD. Directed by David O. Selznick. 1939, Burbank, CA: Time Warner, 1999.


Citing a chapter, article, picture in a collection, anthology or topical encyclopedia
  • Author’s last name, first name, followed by a period
  • Title of the article/chapter, in quotation marks, followed by a period
  • "In" followed by the title of the book (italicized), followed by a comma
  • If there is an editor, put edited by [author’s name], followed by a period
  • City of publication, colon, name of the publisher, followed by a comma
  • Publication date, followed by a comma
  • Page numbers of article, followed by a period

example:
Huxley, Thomas H. “The Darwinian Hypothesis.” In Galileo’s Commandment: Great Science Writing, edited by Edmund Blair Bolles. New York: W.H. Freeman, 1997, 257-266.

example:
“Buddhism”. In Religions of the World, edited by J. Gordon Melton and Martin Baumann.
Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2002, 179-198.

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Citing a periodical (print)
  • Author's last name, first name, followed by a period
  • Title of article, in quotation marks, followed by a period
  • Name of periodical, (italicized) followed by a space
  • Volume number (if available) in arabic numerals, followed by a comma
  • Date published in parentheses, followed by a colon
  • Pages used, followed by a period.

example (magazine with volume number):
Gorman, Christina. "The Avian Flu: How Scared Should We Be?" Time 166, no. 16,
(17 October 2005
): 30 - 34.

example (newspaper)
Begley, Sharon. "One More Reason to Play Harmonica: It's Good for the Pipes." Wall Street Journal (19 October 2006): A1.

Citing a periodical viewed on the Internet
  • Author's last name, first name
  • Title of article, in quotation marks, followed by a period
  • Name of periodical, (italicized)
  • Volume number (if available) in arabic numerals, followed by a comma
  • Date published in parentheses, followed by a colon
  • Pages the article begins and ends, followed by a period.
  • Available from: followed by the website's sponsoring organization
  • URL of article or sponsoring organization, in angle brackets
  • Date of access, in parentheses

example:
Martin, Glen. “Shasta Lake: Tribe Sees Dam Plan as Cultural Genocide, Raising Lake Level Would Drown Sites Sacred to the Winnemem Wintu.” San Francisco Chronicle
(27 February 2005): A-17. Available from: SFGate
(accessed 16 October 2005).

Citing a speech
  • Author's last name, first name, followed by a period and a space
  • Title of speech followed by a period, in quotation marks
  • Type of speech (lecture, keynote address, etc) followed by a comma and a space
  • Circumstances of speech (annual meeting, board presentation, govenment proceedings, etc) followed by a comma and a space
  • Location of speech, including institution if available, followed by a comma and a space
  • Date speech was presented followed by a period.

example:
Schafer, John. "2025." Lecture, Menlo School, Atherton, CA, 3 December 2005.

Citing a web page with an author
  • Author’s last name, first name, followed by a period
  • Title of website in quotation marks, followed by a space
  • Website creation date in parenthses followed by a period and a space
  • The words Available from: followed by the website's sponsoring organization (if this is a personal website do not include a sponsoring organization)
  • URL in angle brackets followed by a space
  • Date of access in parentheses followed by a period.

examples:
Landis, Barbara. "Carlisle Indian Industrial School History" (1996). Available from:
(accessed 21 October 2005).

Salda, Michael. "The Cinderella Project" (2005). Available from: University of Southern Mississippi
(accessed 19 October 2006).

Citing a web page with no author

Cite the organization who sponsors it, or if that information is not available, use the title of the site.

  • Title of web page in quotation marks, followed by a space
  • Website creation date in parentheses followed by a period
  • Available from: followed by the website's sponsoring organization
  • URL in angle brackets
  • Date of access in parentheses followed by a period.

example:
“John Roberts on Abortion” (2005). Available from: On The Issues

(accessed 16 October 2005).

Citing an image viewed in print, including a political cartoon
  • Photographer's name, if available, or author's name if available, followed by a period.
  • Title of photo, if available. If no title, describe briefly. Follow with a period.
  • The word "image" in parentheses (no quotation marks) followed by a period
  • Title of article or book, italicized or underlined.
  • City of publication, followed by a colon
  • Name of publisher, followed by a comma
  • Date of publication, followed by a comma
  • Page number of image, followed by a period.

example (known author or agency):
New China News Agency. "Japanese Tanks" (image). The Rape of Nanking. New York: Penguin, 1997, 146.

example (author unknown):
Angiogram of the Head (image). Encyclopedia of the Human Body. New York: DK Publishing, 2002, 88.


Citing an image viewed online, including a political cartoon

Very important! If you are citing an image found in Google Images or any other image retrieval service, be certain to cite the image in its original context. Do not provide the URL of the enlarged image - you must use the URL of the page where the image was originally shown.

  • Photographer's name, if available, or author's name if available, followed by a period.
  • Title of photo, if available. If no title, describe briefly. Follow with a period.
  • The word "image" in parentheses (no quotation marks) followed by a period
  • Title of article or web page, italicized or underlined.
  • URL in angle brackets
  • Date of access.

example (known author or agency):
Lange, Dorothea. "Destitute Pea Pickers in California. Mother of Seven Thildren. Age Thirty-two. Nipomo, California" (image). Available from: Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (accessed 23 May 2005).

example (author unknown):
Two Women (image). Nigeria. Available from: IDFC
(accessed 20 May 2005).


Citing an article from the online New York Times database (from Menlo Library)
  • Author’s last name comma first, followed by a period
  • Title of the document, in quotation marks (Begin with this if author’s name is not known)
  • The title of the newspaper in italics or underlined
  • The date, month and year of the article
  • If available, the edition of the article appeared (first edition, late edition, etc.)
  • The name of the database: New York Times Historical Collection
  • Menlo School library’s web address in angle brackets
  • Date of access in parentheses

example:
McGowen, Roscoe. “No Cut in Salary for Bomber Star.” New York Times. 6 January 1951, 24.
Available from: New York Times Historical Collection, Menlo School Lib. (accessed 4 August 2003).

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Citing an article from LexisNexis (from Menlo Library)
  • Author’s last name comma first, followed by a period
  • Title of the document, in quotation marks
  • The title of the newspaper in italics or underlined
  • The date, month and year of the article
  • If available, the edition of the article appeared (first edition, late edition, etc.)
  • The name of the Service Provider (Lexis-Nexis)
  • The name of the particular database (e.g. News, Legal Research, Legislation, Statistics)
  • The name of the library that provides the service (Menlo School Lib.)
  • The url of the library in angle brackets
  • The date of access in parentheses

example:
Thomas, George. “Strange Events.” Dallas Morning News. 4 September 1940. 22. late ed. Available from: Lexis-Nexis, News, Menlo School Lib. (accessed 2 January 2004).

Citing an article from the Gale databases (from Menlo Library)
  • Author’s last name comma first, followed by a period
  • Title of the document, in quotation marks
  • The title of the newspaper or journal in italics or underlined
  • The volume number, if applicable
  • The date, month and year of the article
  • The name of the service provider (Gale)
  • The name of the particular database/collection (e.g. Student Resource Center-Gold, Biography Resource Center, History Resource Center: US, , History Resource Center: Modern World, Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center)
  • The name of the library that provides the service (Menlo School Lib.)
  • The url of the library in angle brackets
  • The date of access in parentheses

example:
Lacy, George. “Fashion Trends.” Journal of Fashion. 5 September 1999. Available from: Gale,
Student Resource Center-Gold, Menlo School Lib.
(accessed 5 January 2004).
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Citing an interview
  • Interviewee's last name, first name, followed by a period and a space
  • Interview by followed by the interviewer's name. If it is an interview you conducted yourself you may use the words "interview by the author." Follow with a period and a space.
  • Date of interview in European format followed by a period.
  • If using the transcript of an interview, follow the date above with a period and a space, and include information about where the transcript can be found. If found online use the words "available from" and include the date you found the transcript.

examples:
Hanson, Charles, in discussion with the author. 18 October 2006.

Negroponte, John D. Interview by Robert Siegel. 1 September 2006. Available from Office of
the Director of National Intelligence (accessed 19 October 2006).

Citing indirect sources

To cite a source that was originally published in one source that you viewed in a different source, cite the work in its original form, then add your own source information:

  • Follow the format given for the original source (book, act, etc.)
  • Add a period. Then continue with the words Available from or Quoted in, followed by a colon.
  • Follow the format for the source you used.

Example of article in an anthology with an author and an editor obtained from Gale:
Katz, John. “Campus Speech Codes Violate Free Speech.” Censorship, edited by
Tamara Roleff. N.p.: Greenhaven Press, 2000. Available from: Infotrac, Student
Resource Center-Gold,
Menlo School Lib.
(accessed 10 January 2004).

Example of Congressional Act accessed from a website:
U.S. Congress. Senate Judiciary Committee. "Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act: Testimony
of Douglas Johnson. 105th Congress, 1st sess. 11 March 1997." Available from:
Concerned Women From America
(accessed 4 October 2003).

Example of a print source quoted within another print source:
Green, Nathaniel. "I think we have...". In Papers of George Washington, Revolutionary War Series, W. W. Abbott, Philander D. Chase, and Dorothy Twohig, eds. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998), VI, 222. Quoted in: David McCullough, 1776 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2005), 205.

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